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My New Shed - Very Important Builder Questions

My New Shed - Very Important Builder Questions

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  #1  
Old 07-05-11, 05:56 PM
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My New Shed - Very Important Builder Questions

Ok, so I hired a guy to build me a shed. It is a 16'x24' shed on a slope (see pictures below). I was speaking to the builder today, and he said I needed to go to 5'-6' posts in rear two rows. This drove up the size of posts from 4x4 to 4x6. Also, being that it is a 24' shed, he would have to join the 4x4 posts to make 24' runners.

1) I asked specifically how he planned to join the 4x4 posts to make runners equal 24'. His method is to sandwich the ends with 2x4s. Is this a common method? Is it the proper method?

2) These runners would then go on top of the 4x6 posts that are cemented into the ground. if I remember correctly, he planned to sandwich the runners on top of the posts with 2x4s.

I am paying $6,700 for this shed, and it seems like he is taking a lot of shortcuts. I would have thought to join the 4x4s end to end (making a 24" runner) he would need to use metal fasteners. The same goes for attaching the runners to the posts. Can anyone let me know if I am wrong / right?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-05-11, 06:02 PM
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I do not see any pictures to look at.

What kind of shed is this? A post frame shed? Stick built shed? Does this have a floor? Is that where the runners are? What are the posts for? At 24' x 16' this is more like a garage then a shed.
 
  #3  
Old 07-05-11, 06:53 PM
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Yes, this is more like a garage weighing in at about 2-tons. It is going to have a floor on it. The joists will be 2x4 I think with 2x6s as the actual floor. The runners are obviously what the joists attach to. The posts are what the runners would attach to.



 
  #4  
Old 07-06-11, 03:54 AM
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Is there a good reason this is not utilizing a slab for a floor?? Why are the posts sticking out of the ground so far? If they are supporting floor joisting, looks like a lot of waste.
 
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Old 07-06-11, 04:46 AM
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Got a pretty good slope there would be my guess; camera angle doesn't really show it.
 
  #6  
Old 07-06-11, 05:40 AM
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I hope the floor joists will be larger than 2 x 4's. I am assuming the joists will run parallel to the front, uphill side of the shed, giving them a 12 foot span. For that span you would need 2 x 10's if they are spaced 16" center to center. If he's running the joists in the other direction (front to back) they would be spanning about 5'4" and only need to be 2 x 6's. I never consider a 2 x 4 a floor joist except for a dog house or small, light weight, portable shed. You mentioned "garage" when describing this shed. My floor joist sizes are more for general storage NOT for supporting the weight of cars or medium+ tractors.

When you mentioned you were concerned about splicing the 24' long "runners". I am not sure what you mean. Will this shed actually have runners to be portable?
 
  #7  
Old 07-06-11, 06:03 AM
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Pilot, difficult following the description, but my guess is the 4x4's are beams on top of the posts with the deck on top of that. Not sure what the plan is, but 4x4's don't make very sturdy beams when laid horizontally.

Also, if those are 5' to 6' posts in the rear, how much is in the ground? Front as well? I would also question what is under those posts. Concrete poured into a hole when they are set is used for fence posts to help them stand up, not provide vertical support. There should have been a footing under each. Plus I'm not a fan of burying the posts.

Once up, there will need to be substantial lateral bracing to keep the posts from tipping over under a strong wind.

Your question on connecting the 4x4' is part of knowing where they are being used and that isn't clear as yet.

Did you or he draw up a set of plans before this started?

Bud
 
  #8  
Old 07-06-11, 01:02 PM
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To answer a few questions. I just got home and talked to him and reviewed the shed.

1) The hill is on a BIG slope. The posts were rough-set. They are at least 24" into the ground. And the rear posts are 5ft above, 24"+ buried.

2) He is using 2x6's for the floor joists. Not 2x4s. My apologies for the confusion.

3) The runners are ok. The splice-point is actually set on top of a existing post. So it's as solid as a regular post I would imagine.

4) He ended up using 2x6s to connect the runners to the posts themselves. I talked to him and he went up in size. He stated the metal fasteners wouldn't be as strong. I had to yield to him as I really haven't done this before. Pictures coming soon.
 
  #9  
Old 07-06-11, 01:07 PM
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Is this a shed for general hand tools or is it going to see heavier loads like parking vehicles, equipment and storing grain or fertilizer in bulk? I'm curious as to the loads this shed might see.
 
  #10  
Old 07-06-11, 02:11 PM
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Slope or not, that's why God made fill dirt and gravel. I would have poured it and forgot about all this wood stuff in the ground. It's gonna rot anyway.
 
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