Shed foundation advice

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  #1  
Old 05-02-13, 02:22 PM
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Shed foundation advice

I'm planning on building a 10x12 Gable style shed on a slight grade. (less than 1' difference in slope). I plan to use solid concrete blocks evenly spaced to support the 2x6 foundation frame. I plan to use it to store a riding mower and miscellaneous yard supplies. I might store a few bags of top soil or even concrete from time to time, although I would store this near the walls. Maybe 6' high at the peak. 2x4 constructions for the frame and pre-finished wood shed siding panels for the walls. I plan to start with 3" of gravel under each block and of course level everything out, etc.

My question is how many blocks do I need? I was thinking 9 would be enough, spacing them out evening. (3 rows of blocks, 2 along the edges and one down the middle.) Is that enough? Too much?

For the framing of the foundation itself (2x6), is 16" on center okay? Do I need to install any short (14.5") supports between the beams for extra support?

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 05-03-13, 04:20 AM
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2 X 6's are not going to be strong enough for that span and that amount of weight.
Trying to cut corners or save a tiny bit of money on the floor framing will come back and bite you on the butt.
Make sure that sheds at least 6" higher then the grade or the sidings going to rot from the splash back.
I hope I just misread your post, make the walls 8' tall not 6'.
Also why 10'? If you made it 12' there will be less wasted siding.
No one's ever made shed to big.
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-13, 05:01 AM
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Okay, I can do 2x8's instead. I was thinking 6' sides, not peak, but I can play with that. What's the standard height? 8'?

For my area, 10x12 is the cut off for a simple shed permit verses a full fledged building permit. I'm actually wondering if having a shed will increase my property taxes. Besides I really don't need something more.

Still looking for help on the foundation. Same question about blocks, but assume I'll use 2x8s as you suggest. That was something I was wondering about.

thank you for the help.
 
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Old 05-03-13, 05:06 AM
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Locally, most any shed built under 100 sq ft requires no permit and has almost no regulation... so I understand that part

The height depends on a lot of things. Some locales do restrict the height but generally a shed is more usable if you have plenty of head rm. A higher ceiling also helps to make it a little cooler as heat rises and small areas like a shed can heat up fairly quick.
 
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Old 05-03-13, 05:15 AM
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Here's to hoping this thread continues as I'm hoping to build exactly the same thing in the next while for exactly the same purpose! Basically storing riding mower and all the rest of the lawn/garden type stuff to get it out of our regular shed so you can actually move around in there.

Someone posted a video on here a while back that showed a step by step process of building a shed. The video was great.
 
  #6  
Old 05-03-13, 06:24 AM
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marksr,

Thanks for your help. I'll check with the zoning people on the height. Speaking of shed heat, what's the theory on venting? I generally get wind from the west, so should I put a vent low on that side of the shed and then another vent higher up on the opposite side? Or is it better to bring the roof out an extra few inches and create a vent there in the soffit? Also, any thoughts on how many blocks I'll need to set under the foundation? (I was hoping to get started with that before having to gather up all the lumber).
 
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Old 05-03-13, 12:50 PM
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Blocks - I would think 3 across the front and 3 across the back would be enough although it might not hurt to have one or two in the middle.

Heat rises so as long as the air can come in low and exit high - it doesn't matter a whole lot where the vents are placed.
 
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Old 05-03-13, 01:39 PM
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As Joe said, there's typically no such thing as too big when it comes to a shed, garage, or other accessory building. And, depending on your zoning, it is possible that you are limited to a single accessory structure, so adding a second shed when you outgrow this one may not be an option. As part of your decision process, you may want to call your local assessor's office, and ask what criteria is used for calculating your tax base. Not that it may not change, but at least you would know where you stand today. Is this shed going to be out back and out of sight? If not, and if applicable, it is going to be added to your tax calculation sooner or later, whether you show your hand by pulling a permit or not. So, if that's the case, what's the big deal in pulling a permit? If you have questions, you can always come back here for clarification, to make sure that you are building it correctly, but it is afterall a shed, so nothing complicated, and while inspectors are human, hence some have just plain nasty personalities, the majority of the ones that I have dealt with are very decent, and some in fact very helpful. Point being, don't cut yourself short by any preconceived notions that the inspector is going to run you through the rickets. You want to do it right anyway, right?
 
  #9  
Old 05-04-13, 05:01 AM
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So, planning on getting started with this today. Thinking of using 9 patio stones with 4" deck blocks for the foundation. Flooring framing will be 2X8" pressure treated.

As for the framing of the walls, is there any advantage to using pressure treated? My thoughts are, once the framing is up to use roofing felt as a vapor barrier, and siding the thing with pressure treated deck or fence board.

Again, this will be used to store all of our gardening stuff, lawnmowers, etc.
 
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Old 05-04-13, 05:12 AM
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Bill, you should be fine using regular framing lumber for the walls since I doubt you have much chance of extensive bug damage - might be different if you lived in the tropics. Do you intend to install the siding vertically like a barn?
 
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Old 05-04-13, 05:17 AM
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Was thinking horizontal as it would just be easier to deck screw it to the framing. Trying to keep this as simple as possible and not over build which my wife already says I'm going to anyway!.
 
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Old 05-04-13, 05:45 AM
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I'd consider regular siding if you are going horizontal. The crack between boards lets water get behind the siding. It would almost be better not to have tar paper if you go that route - it would dry quicker. I've built sheds on the cheap just using plywood, primer and paint for the siding.
 
  #13  
Old 05-04-13, 05:53 AM
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Oh man, there's a lot of things to consider. I hadn't thought about that. I was thinking of the tar paper as I didn't want moisture getting inside on the plywood floor and causing it to rot.

This is why I paint. I've been called a wood butcher and I'm sure lumber cringes when it sees me with a measuring tape.
 
  #14  
Old 05-04-13, 06:58 AM
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Regarding the 10x12 foundation using 2x8PT. I plan to make the door(s) for the lawn tractor on the 10' (peak) end. Does this have any bearing on how I should build the foundation? In other words, in a 10x12 foundation, I could build the frame using (approx) 10' lengths or (approx) 12' lengths, 16" on center either way. Seems I'd get better support all around running the boards 10'.
 
  #15  
Old 05-04-13, 01:44 PM
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The shorter the span, the stronger the floor joist will be.

Bill, as a painter, I'm sure you know how to make a wood butcher's job look decent
 
  #16  
Old 05-05-13, 01:05 PM
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May have more questions, but just wanted to say thanks for the info I've gotten so far. Appreciated.
 
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