8 x 20 shed with 10 x 20 lean to overhang

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Old 09-10-13, 08:43 AM
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8 x 20 shed with 10 x 20 lean to overhang

So I'm trying to build a shed where half of it is a storage shed and the other half is a lean to type overhang to park my truck. I want it to be a single gable type roof with the ridge over the shed wall. I'm having a hard time figuring out how to make the center shed wall with the ridge beam over it.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 09:09 AM
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The wall that divides the shed and the carport would be 2'-3' taller than the exterior walls. I'm a painter, not a carpenter but it should be as easy as fastening a ridge board over the top plate and the installing your rafters to set on the other shed wall and the header that runs along the outside 'wall' of the carport.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 04:42 PM
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If I do that I'd have to have a 1 on 12 pitch in order for the bottom of the rafter not to hit the edge of the top plate.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 05:28 PM
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Old 09-11-13, 03:04 AM
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If I do that I'd have to have a 1 on 12 pitch in order for the bottom of the rafter not to hit the edge of the top plate
How do you figure that A 1/12 pitch would have the center wall less than 1' higher than the side walls. The carport is only 10' wide, right? will the shed floor be wood or concrete? the shed floor also raises the head room in the carport.
 
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Old 09-11-13, 05:32 AM
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Ridge Beam

Why would you need a ridge beam? Support the upper ends of the rafters with the inner wall.(Make the inner wall high enough to get the correct roof pitch.) You did not say what the roof pitch will be. As mentioned, use the shed floor as the reference point to level the outside lean-to posts.
 
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Old 09-11-13, 02:30 PM
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Mark I was thinking of a 2x 6 ridge beam attached directly to the shed inner wall. In order for the bottom of the rafter not to hit the top plate of the wall it would have to be a pretty flat pitch. I think I can just put the ridge beam up over the wall more to get the pitch I want, probably about 3 on 12.
The last pic that joe posted is what I have in mind without the little angle drop in the corners thats just deco. In that pic I can see the ridge is more over the shed half, because the center of the entire structure is more over the shed. SInce mine will be an 8 foot shed with a 10 foot overhang the center would be more in the overhang. I'm thinking I will center the ridge over the middle wall, making the shed pitch 3 on 12 for the shed and whatever it ends up being on the overhang part. Just keep the posts for the overhang level with the shed outside wall.
 
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Old 09-12-13, 03:52 AM
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IMO it looks better if the roof pitch is the same on both sides. Assuming the shed floor is a step up, the longer carport roof wouldn't make for significant loss of headroom.

The ridge beam doesn't have to be a 2x6, you can use a bigger 2x but I like wirepuller' suggestion of setting the rafters on the top plate instead
 
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Old 09-12-13, 06:15 AM
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Top Plate

I neglected to mention in my earlier post that the top plate needs to be a doubled 2x. You will need a shallow birds mouth on the top end of the rafter so they will rest flat in the top plate. I probably would use a gusset to connect the top ends of opposite joining rafters.
 
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Old 09-12-13, 10:24 AM
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Thanks for the input. I am going to just attach the rafters to the top plate as suggested. I'm guessing it would work better to do a birds mouth on the top to make it rest flat on the top plate rather than putting the rafter against the side of the top plates like how it would be attached to a ridge beam.

I'm in a toss up on whether to keep the pitch the same and have the outside top plates at different heights or to let the pitch change to keep those wall heights the same. I think it would look odd for the overhang side to come lower than the shed side. Headroom isn't an issue for sure since the shed floor ends up being about 12 " up anyway.

With the middle wall being 8' and the outer wall being 7', should i just build the other 3 walls all 7' then use a fascia board to make the angle of that wall? or should I make all of the other 3 walls on an angle to match the roof pitch?I'm leaning toward the easy way unless there's some serious draw back.

I'm building the center wall at 8' today.
 
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Old 09-12-13, 10:31 AM
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Name:  Shed floor2.jpg
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Heres the beginning
 
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  #12  
Old 09-12-13, 01:44 PM
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What type of roof do you intend to use? 1.5/12 pitch isn't very much! A 3/12 pitch would have the middle wall 2' higher than the outside wall that's 8' away. I don't think it makes too much difference which way you build the non load bearing walls ..... but I'm a painter, not a carpenter Are those blocks just setting in the hole or is there concrete poured underneath them?
 
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Old 09-12-13, 02:10 PM
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I think that low pitch is good enough to serve my purpose. The blocks are just sitting in the dirt. There's enough of them that they won't sink alot. I'm going to put a sheet metal roof. The carport side will be 1.2 on 12.
 
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Old 09-13-13, 05:48 AM
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Blocks

The flat side of the block needs to rest on the ground to make a larger foot print and support more weight.
 
  #15  
Old 09-20-13, 12:57 PM
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Seems alot more likely to crack the blocks that way. I'll let yall know in 5 years if it sank
 
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