Total noob questions-first time build

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Old 05-08-14, 09:04 AM
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Total noob questions-first time build

ok so I have done hours of research to minimize mistakes while building my 12X16 shed. I have a couple questions as I put together my material list.

1. When you frame a wall with 8' studs, the actual wall height is 8'3". Doesnt this reek havoc with the sheathing? Do i really have to buy an extra piece of sheathing to cover the last 3"? Is there something in the actual length of the material I am missing or is it common to cut 3" off each stud so the wall is exactly 8'? Should I not be sheathing over the top/sole plates?

2. I am building the floor from 2x6 with joist hangers. I will also buy the AdvanTech 23/32 tongue and groove osb floor panels for maximum strength. Will this be sufficient to store a muscle car over the winter?

thanks in advance!
 
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Old 05-08-14, 09:15 AM
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Wall studs are not 8' they are 92 1/4", they are purchased at that length, no need to cut them. As far as the flooring, it depends on how far you space the joists.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 09:21 AM
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Dang man, that was fast. Thank you sooooo much. Ok, very cool. I do see now where you can get 96" and 92 5/8. that answers that question.

I was gonna space 12"OC for the floor. Are the joist hangers a waste of money? Also, it would seem that some additional bracing would be a waste of time as well since all the stress would ultimately end up where the joist meet the outside, no?

thanks again!
 
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Old 05-08-14, 10:11 AM
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2x4" are commonly available in two lengths. 8' and stud length. Oddly sometimes the longer 8' ones are less expensive.

Joist hangers are a good idea. You mention "additional bracking" but do not say what you are considering. But if using 2x6" floor joists I'd say you'll need additional support.

Also, I would say 2x6" are too small to support the weight of a car even with a 12" spacing. Search online, there are many span tables to show you the acceptable span distance. This calculator allows you to enter in your information then provides a maximum horizontal span.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 10:53 AM
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Thanks PD, much appreciated. I will take a look at that calc. By additional bracing, I just meant to place some 2x6 between the existing 12" 2x6's (in the opposite direction, obviously, making almost a "grid". You guys are great. Quick learning.....good stuff.

thanks again!
 
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Old 05-08-14, 10:59 AM
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What you're talking about is called blocking, just for future reference
 
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Old 05-08-14, 11:23 AM
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Cool. Thanks Mitch! Does it help at all? If I planned on staying in the house long term, I would just build (have built) a garage. For now I need space and I need my 68 Nova out of my garage in the winter for when other cars need repair. According to the calc (using 40 psf live load) I can span 10'6, which is close. Would the joist hangers, blocking or the crazy expensive OSB I am gonna put down put me over the top in your opinion? I was gonna pour 9 piers but after the advice on this forum, I am figuring I better just lay her down on a gravel base. Any advice is seriously appreciated!
 
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Old 05-08-14, 01:22 PM
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Yes, blocking does help as it transfers the load from one joist to the adjoining ones helping spread out the load. The trouble with a car is that it's load is not evenly spread over the floor. You've got four points (tires) of contact and in either direction two of them will line up putting a heavy load under that joist.

The joists are the structure of the floor. Technically the premium sheeting above does not increase the floor's load carrying ability. It just allows you to go to a greater span between joists without the decking sagging in between. I'm sure you want to stay with 2x6 to keep the deck height as close to the ground as possible but I'd feel better stepping up to 2x8's and possibly doubling up or going even closer together where the wheels will spend the winter sitting.

Another thing you can do is split the span. If you run a beam down the center of your garage the 2x6 need only span 6' which is well within the limits. Or, use a center beam and run your joists the other direction for a 8' span.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 01:37 PM
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Oh thats good stuff. I was gonna switch out to 2x8 but if I can simply add a center beam, that makes a lot of sense. I am the reason people should pay professionals but I really like to try stuff and use my tools. Thanks for all the great advice. I will be back, I'm sure.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 01:57 PM
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You guys are geniuses. I just did the math...correct me if I am wrong.....I can go "across" the center with a 2x6x12 and then run my joists "vertically" with 2x6x8 on each side and be well within range? As an extra bonus that would save me $150 on the build, which leaves me money to dbl up on some joist that the car will sit on.
 
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Old 05-13-14, 09:53 AM
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I am back looking for some more novice advice. Lowes had an online deal yesterday so I place a bunch of lumber orders a little sooner than I wanted to since I have limited space to store this stuff. Anyhow.....before building the floor (PT lumber) should I let it sit in the sun to dry out for a week or so? I dont wanna end up with warped/twisted boards, I am not sure if that is inevitable.....

Also, I have OSB and untreated siding coming. Is that ok leave outside or do I need to keep that dry? I assume non-treated lumber (studs, etc) should def be stored in the garage?

thanks!
 
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