Runners: Building new shed

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Old 11-17-14, 12:29 PM
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Runners: Building new shed

I'm building a lean-to-shed on the side of my house. It will only be 4x10'. The runners will sit on 6 concrete blocks and eventually tied with concrete ties into the blocks with a 2nd concrete pour. Currently the blocks are pinned and poured with room for the second joining pin and pour.

My question is about the size of the runners. Can I use 4x4 pressure treated runners? 4x4x10' PT runners are $12 at Lowes/HD. 4x6x12' PT runners are $27. HUGE price change and I would need to cut 2 ft. off on top of it...whereas the 4x4's I could just use.

All the sheds in the parking lot of lowes are on 4x4's including huge 10'x12' sheds.
 
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Old 11-17-14, 01:24 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

If it's a lean to shed on the side of your house - why do you need runners

4x4s should be fine, don't forget to angle cut the ends
 
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Old 11-17-14, 01:25 PM
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Confusing, if your going to be poring a slab under this addition why are you using 4 X 4's and not 2 X 4's for a bottom plate?
Sure hope this slab is going to be at least 6" above grade and not bigger then the building or waters going to come I under the walls and the siding will rot.
Why would you not be attaching this to the side of the other building? Sounds like your just sitting it next to it.
Got a picture of where this is going? Might help clear things up.
 
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Old 11-17-14, 02:11 PM
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Thanks for the replies and welcome. Sorry for the confusion. The shed is like this: https://www.icreatables.com/sheds/4x...hed-plans.html
The shed is going high side against the house.
I'm not pouring a foundation...sorry if that's what it sounded like.

My house has substantial grade coming off the foundation. Its basically 1 foot down within 4 ft of the house. I want to maintain that grade to ensure proper water drain under the shed and away from the home foundation. That really prevents a level foundation.

Imagine this to be more like a shed on "stilts" in a hurricane area.

So I dug 6 holes, 1 on each corner, 2 in the middle, poured concrete, set the blocks in the concrete and then pinned the blocks to the concrete with rebar dowels into the concrete and ground, pouring half way up the block. I will build on top of these four blocks setting each runners on top of 3 of the blocks. Then I will bolt concrete tie rods from the runners into the rest of the open space of the blocks and do a 2nd pour of the concrete tying together the pin and the tie rods. It will be plenty sturdy. I feel confident its not going anywhere. The purpose of the concrete is really only to keep the blocks more stable. Imagine using pillar mounts to pour concrete where "the blocks" are never removed compared to the pillar molds made out of cardboard tubing. The concrete blocks have a footing and the weight goes up dramatically being filled with concrete---very study. However, the runners will have about 3 feet between concrete block pillars where they do not touch the ground on the side away from the house. On the heavy high side, the whole runner is on 3 blocks as well but that's very close to the ground.

Yes, its just sitting next to the house but it will be bolted to these concrete blocks. I don't see a problem with water. On the side next to the house, there is at least 4 inchs of pressure treated wood there which is actually about an inch above the home foundation grade. Since its graded straight down there will be NO standing water that at all and the whole house would flood before the shed floods.
I'm not following the "angle cuts"??

Are you talking about angle cutting the ends of the runners so its like a sled and can be pushed?
 

Last edited by hiddenglen78681; 11-17-14 at 02:29 PM.
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Old 11-17-14, 03:03 PM
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I don't see a need for the runners if the shed isn't going to be movable.
 
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Old 11-17-14, 03:33 PM
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Umm, well technical it is "moveable". If someone complains, I will move it....lol Unbolt it and tear down the cinder blocks. So yes, it needs to be "technically" moveable. Of course, that will take two jacks and not be much fun if I have to do that.
 
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Old 11-17-14, 03:37 PM
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If you think it might be moved at a later date, cutting the bottom half of the ends of the 4x4s will make it easier to slide it across the ground.
 
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Old 11-17-14, 03:43 PM
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I didn't see your location mentioned. Are you in cold country? One of the problems related to cold country is that the soil 4' away from the house may lift more than the soil next to the foundation. This can be seen all over Maine. The result is your shed would tip towards the house.

What is your frost depth?

Bud
 
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Old 11-17-14, 03:44 PM
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ahh..ok, that is what I thought he might be saying. Ok, I will do that. I'm hoping I won't have to move it and would need to hire someone if I did have to. Its approved by the home owners assoc. but people can still complain after the fact.... So you think 4x4's will work or would they break under the stress?
 
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Old 11-17-14, 03:53 PM
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No, I'm in Central Texas. We do get maybe one freeze per year but its usually a 2 day thing. More likely the ground cracks from being too dry.

Tipping towards the house is a good thing...tipping away from the house is bad. Frost line here is less than a foot. Honestly, I'd say its practically less than 6 inches. We have winters where it never gets to freezing, probably 2 for every 1.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 04:08 AM
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So you think 4x4's will work or would they break under the stress?
4x4s should be fine although care should be used when moving the shed. You'd want to gently glide the shed along the ground and not 'bounce' across rough areas.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 06:05 AM
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The trick I've found for moving sheds is to lay down some 2 by material for the skids to slide on and watch the turns.

Texas, that does make a difference in the frost depth. And that clay!! I'm sitting on pure clay, but it never dries so never moves. Does make drainage a challenge.

Bud
 
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Old 11-19-14, 09:03 AM
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Under the grass is clay and below that is a mixture of Austin limestone and stuff that is rock solid rigid and back breaking to dig. I dug down below the surface clay and layed down road mix that could be packed and used a tool to level and pack the ground before applying concrete and adding the blocks. So the blocks are cemented to the ground. This will also help to prevent erosion at the footing because the water runs down the block and around the concrete leading the "moving water" away from the weight bearing surface into the clay. The clay is virtually erosion proof...I can't even get the stuff off my shovel with the hose running full blast...very annoying stuff.

I hope the shed will slide on 2x4. Because I will actually build the shed about 1 foot AWAY from the house so that I can finish the back side construction and paint. Then I will push the shed to the wall of the house, remove the 2x4's and have the runners come down on the blocks to finish the shed. I HOPE that will work. I will probably do that with the walls still open and unfinished except for the back so the weight is not too bad yet.
 
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Old 11-19-14, 10:02 AM
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The hardest part of moving a shed on runners is getting it moving initially, that can take a good bit of muscle ..... I prefer using a tractor
 
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