Installing glass in wood greenhouse door

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-22-15, 08:38 AM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
Installing glass in wood greenhouse door

We've build ourselves a greenhouse. The door is a panel door (if that is the correct name). I've taken out the plywood panels top and bottom and have the glass to replace them. On one side of the door the original trim or moulding is intact. It's gone on the other side. My question is - what would be the best way to hold it on that side. So far, I have thought about glazing (the tube stuff - which I've used before on windows) or wood moulding that I'd probably pin nail in place. Any thoughts on this?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-22-15, 08:57 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,561
Caulking between the glass and the wood with a narrow molding to hold the glass in place. Since the door wasn't designed for glass are you sure it will be stout enough?
 
  #3  
Old 01-22-15, 09:43 AM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
Honestly, I'm not totally sure. I guess we'll find out. Thanks for the advice.
 
  #4  
Old 01-22-15, 03:01 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,234
By code, door glass should be tempered safety glass.

And silicone is probably the preferred glazing, assuming none of it will be exposed, and it will all be hidden by your wooden stops. Silicone isn't paintable so you usually only use it to seal the glass... not as the caulking after its assembled.
 
  #5  
Old 02-15-15, 05:22 AM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
Ready to install glass. Quick question - silicone between glass and wood everywhere? that is all three sides glass touches wood?
 
  #6  
Old 02-15-15, 05:34 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5,829
The problem with using silicon to mount glass is if and when the glass break and you need to replace it, the silicon is very nasty to get rid of and the glass edges. I'll run into this occasionally when people bring me windows to be repaired that they tried to repair themselves using silicon. It take twice as long and leaves me open to very nasty cuts.

Why can't you use typical glazing compound? There is a product called zipIt from Red Devil meant as a removable silicon weather strip.

 
  #7  
Old 02-15-15, 05:45 AM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
I could, but the question remains. Do I put it everywhere glass meets wood or just between the end of the glass and the wood?
 
  #8  
Old 02-15-15, 05:51 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,561
You just need a continuous bead to make a seal between the glass and the wood, doesn't have to cover all the wood.
 
  #9  
Old 02-15-15, 06:06 AM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
Okay good. If I am understanding you the silicone doesn'the so much seal as hold it snug.
 
  #10  
Old 02-15-15, 06:46 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5,829
It does both. But I hope you're using glazing points to retain the glass firmly against the wood frame. Otherwise wind and temp changes will cause the glass to rattle and break the seal of the caulk or silicon.
 
  #11  
Old 02-15-15, 06:53 AM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
Good idea. I can do that.
 
  #12  
Old 02-15-15, 09:57 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,234
Just don't use silicone anywhere you will be painting and don't break the glass when you insert the glazing points.
 
  #13  
Old 02-15-15, 10:02 AM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
Thanks XSleeper. I just installed the smaller piece of glass this morning. Tried to be extremely careful and nothing broke - even when nailing in the stops. Went to pull out the larger piece of glass from the corner of the shop and, well, it exploded. Still not sure what the hell I did wrong there. I guess this stuff really is very fragile......back to the glass store....
 
  #14  
Old 02-15-15, 10:20 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5,829
Large pieces of glass can be tricky. Recently I had a 36 x 40 piece on the glass table at work. Went to pick it up and it kind of suctioned itself to the table surface. What a mess. I think people heard me cussing across the whole store.
 
  #15  
Old 02-15-15, 10:26 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,234
You can't bump the edge of tempered glass or it will shatter. Other than that, its very tough which is why its used in doors.
 
  #16  
Old 02-28-15, 12:02 PM
doc
doc is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Indiana
Posts: 403
First, thanks to you all for the help advice thus far on this door. Got the two panes of glass in and the door installed in the greenhouse. I was going to install a "swivel staple safety hasp" but have discovered they don't work when the door is inset (it's an inswing). I need something because the door knob we have for the door doesn't have the mechanism for a latch - just the knob for esthetics Any ideas? Just FYI - the outside of the door is set in about 2". Help!
 
  #17  
Old 02-28-15, 12:10 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,234
Maybe just put a door closer on it?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'