Secure gazebo with cinder blocks in ground?

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  #1  
Old 06-01-15, 06:16 AM
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Secure gazebo with cinder blocks in ground?

I am thinking of getting a 10x10 gazebo but it will be a temporary summer structure put onto the ground (earth/gravel).
I am thinking of securing it to the ground with a cinder block at each corner buried into the ground.
Is this a good way, any alternatives?
If I use cinder blocks, what bolts / cement screws should I use to secure it down?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-01-15, 06:27 AM
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There are screw anchors that might be easier to install. You screw/auger them into the ground and leave the metal ring above ground to tie your rope to.

 
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Old 06-01-15, 06:32 AM
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Will that work against strong winds?
Secondly, I think the metal post of the gazebo has 4 holes in it that you can put screws or bolts through. This anchor wouldn't go through those I don't think although it would work for guy ropes.
 
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Old 06-01-15, 09:15 AM
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In my opinion..... a single cinder block in each corner will not be enough weight to hold your gazebo down in the wind.
 
  #5  
Old 06-01-15, 10:55 AM
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2? 3?
Concrete in a paint bucket?
Any other ides to secure it?
 
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Old 06-01-15, 11:08 AM
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The screw anchors into the ground are what's used to support telephone poles. If you ever see a cable diagonal from apole to the ground there's a spiral anchor in the ground holding it. In most cases the anchor will still be in the ground if your gazebo gets ripped away in a tornado.
 
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Old 06-01-15, 11:38 AM
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That is with cables or ropes though.
I have to secure the base of the metal post on each corner into the ground somehow...
 
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Old 06-01-15, 12:48 PM
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Then I'd use a post hole digger and embed some threaded rod to go into the foot pads. I'd dig down as deep as possible then put the threaded rod through the base plates and held in place with nuts. Use wood bracing to hold the gazebo in position so the feet can hold the rods in position while you add concrete to the holes. I would leave the concrete about 6" below grade. Then when it hardens you can fill the hole with dirt or gravel. Leaving the concrete low gives you the option of cutting off the threaded rod so you can abandon the concrete in place without having to dig it up.
 
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Old 06-01-15, 01:23 PM
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Do you need to create forms for the concrete or are you just pouring it into a hole dug out of soil?

What about sonotube from 4" pvc?
 
  #10  
Old 06-01-15, 01:24 PM
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You aren't exactly in tornado country, but a good 60 mph wind will move some rather heavy objects.
Choose between following the mfgs suggested solution, or talk to your local code officials for what they require. The reason for following someone else's requirements is to remove the liability from you. Plus, your insurance company may need an approved solution.

It might turn out that some chain and 4 - 5 gallon buckets filled with cement buried to some depth will work, but I'd want someone's approval first.

Bud
 
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Old 06-01-15, 02:37 PM
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We are building one this week for a client, and although it is in kit form, I am not toe nailing it to the flooring (which is super heavy) as they indicate in their instructions. I can see that parachute going down the river, now. Two angle braces on each upright secured to the flooring joists is my choice, but it appears you may not have a floor, so I'm not sure how that would work. I do know you will lose height if you bury the uprights in buckets or in block below grade. Just something to think about.
 
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Old 06-02-15, 07:12 AM
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Does building code apply to a 10x10ft tent?
I don't want to lose height.
I guess the question is what weight does each corner need for what wind strength?
I've seen an 80lb sand bag used in some videos as well.
If using cinder blocks, I'd have to secure 2 cinder blocks together at each corner and then the frame to that? or 2angle braces on each frame and then onto the cinder blocks.
 
  #13  
Old 06-02-15, 08:56 AM
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@"Does building code apply to a 10x10ft tent?"
If your local code authority say it does, it does.
I built a free standing deck in the next town over and checked with the local code authority and they required 4 of those screw in anchors for a 12' x 20' deck, even though it was bolted to 2' x 2' x 6" (owner installed) pads in 6 places. He said, they require chains and the screw in anchors, no exceptions. So we installed them.

It's not just the damage to your gazebo, it is where it comes down.

Bud
 
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Old 06-02-15, 11:04 AM
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Where do the screw in anchors attach to?
They won't fir through the holes in the post bottom I don't think
 
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Old 06-02-15, 01:51 PM
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You'd probably need a rope or cable down to them. They can be very close to the post/column but most that I've seen have an eye on the end so they won't work for going through a hole in a foot pad.

There are also driven "duckbill" earth anchors. Most of them have a cable.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 07:51 PM
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None of the gazebos are sold with areas to attach chains or ropes to. The manufacturers say anchor down each corner with bolts or screws.
How does 40kg concrete on each corner sound secured with anchor bolts?
Is there much difference between anchor bolts and threaded rod?
 
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Old 06-04-15, 03:31 AM
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I would drill a 1/4" hole through the posts, run 3/16" aircraft cable through it and loop it to a u-bolt connection, then drill in the loop anchors as Dane suggested, performing the same loop and u-bolt connection on it. Threaded rod, unless embedded in concrete with a bend in the rod will pull out of the ground.

If you have ever seen one of the metal carports installed, you will note they use rebar with a nut welded to the top for anchorage. Total funny. We have winds falling off the mountains that will blow one of those carports away in the valleys, so people have to install the screw anchors and tie them to the anchors to keep them grounded.
 
  #18  
Old 06-04-15, 04:31 AM
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What weight does each corner need?
 
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Old 06-04-15, 04:49 AM
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How much is subjective and depends on the gazebo and wind. In calm winds you could get by with nothing. At 15 or 20 mph maybe a few cinder blocks on each corner would work. A 30 or 40 mph gust from a thunderstorm could take several hundred pounds or ground anchors on each corner. 50 or 60 mph from a storm might end up damaging the gazebo no matter how it's anchored.

A 10 x 10' tent or gazebo has 100 square feet. I've flown airplanes with 80 square foot wings so I know that 80 square feet can get a thousand pounds off the ground at 60 mph.
 
  #20  
Old 06-04-15, 04:52 AM
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I've done this. And I can tell you with absolute certainty that the blocks will work. See this thread for a pic of what I did. This method has stood up the worst wind storms we've had. I'm going to make new ones that will be more decorative.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...ed-nailer.html
 
  #21  
Old 06-04-15, 03:28 PM
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How much weight in each garden pot do you have? and 2 n each corner?
I guess a gazebo roof isn't going to have anywhere near as much lift as a plane wing but I get the point.
My 2 options are 50kg of concrete on each corner secured with anchor bolts drilled holes instead of threaded rods. Can I go lighter than 50kg? It will be 200kg total, 4 x 50.
Or these: "Pylex" Foundation Screw | RONA
 
  #22  
Old 06-04-15, 06:18 PM
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One thing most people don't know is that almost anything is heavier than concrete, even aluminum. If you want to make anchor weights for the corners start thinking about what you can throw into the mix to increase it's weight. Old brake rotors or disks, pump housings, engine parts, lead wheel weights can all increase the mass of your weights while keeping them an attractive size.
 
  #23  
Old 06-06-15, 05:19 PM
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Might sound odd bit manufacturers guidelines say to only secure it with stakes into the ground. Guy at hardware shop said to hammer in rebar or threaded bars into the ground and secure it on that.
I tried hammering in a bar and it was very hard to pull out of the ground... probably harder than lifting 50kg concrete. Only thing is that a bit of sideways action back and forth and it might eventually come loose?
 
  #24  
Old 06-07-15, 03:22 AM
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I suspect the manufacture expects it to be just used on a temporary basis in which case stakes would work fine. For stakes to work on a semi-permanent basis you'd need to check them periodically to make sure they are secure.
 
  #25  
Old 06-22-15, 10:34 AM
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Thanks for the tip! Did not know I could do that!
 
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