Lean to shed roof

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  #1  
Old 12-28-15, 11:09 AM
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Lean to shed roof

I am planning on building a lean to shed (5ft deep x 12ft wide). I want to make the height in the front 7ft (so I can walk through the door without ducking down) and have the slope go down toward the back. I cannot seems to find any plans for a shed like this or pictures of a shed like this. Is there a reason for this? Is there a problem building a shed like this?

Also do I need an over hang on all sides? How big of a slant should this be? Is 5ft on the back side steep enough?

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 12-28-15, 11:51 AM
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Plans

Look through these. You may be able to modify to suit your needs:

https://www.icreatables.com/sheds/sh...s-lean-to.html
 
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Old 12-28-15, 12:19 PM
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Post a picture of what your going to be attaching this to.
Not sure what you mean by "the back side".
Makes no since to me to make it that low.
Google "shed style roof details" for lot of pictures.
 
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Old 12-28-15, 12:59 PM
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It is going to be free standing with a door in front, which will be the high part of the shed. By back I mean opposite of the door. Below is a link to a similar shed, but I want the high side to be the door.
https://www.google.com/search?q=lean...VYwflcoroqM%3A
 
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Old 12-28-15, 03:54 PM
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Shed

It should not be too difficult to install the door(s) on the opposite side. The door opening will be the same. The space above the door will be a little taller.
 
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Old 12-28-15, 04:06 PM
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Ok that's what I was thinking but I wasn't sure if there was an issue doing this, like rain and leaking or it looks terrible. It's just oddni can't find any plans or pictures of a shed like it.
 
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Old 12-28-15, 04:16 PM
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Why would you want a shed to slope backward and drain all the water and debris to the main building? I am assuming that by "lean to" that it is attached or leaning on another building. In that case, making the attached side the low side is a bad idea. Can you include a picture of the space so we can see what you are dealing with? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html Also include measurements to the overhang of the main building and why you want it to slope backwards.
 
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Old 12-28-15, 04:24 PM
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I linked to a picture below. It is a free standing one away from any structures.
https://www.google.com/search?q=lean...VYwflcoroqM%3A
 
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Old 12-28-15, 04:52 PM
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Here is one of mine, about the size you mentioned:
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Bud
 
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Old 12-28-15, 04:55 PM
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If it is free standing, then it is a shed with a single pitched roof but not leaning not anything. Your limiting factor on the roof pitch will be the shingles that you choose. Most will list a minimum pitch on the installation instructions. However, you can get solid body roof panels that may work. You could also incorporate a peaked roof as you are building from scratch if that design better fits with your surroundings. A salt box design would incorporate both the lean to feel with a double pitched roof.
 
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Old 12-28-15, 07:51 PM
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The reason I chose a lean to vs a typical roof is the ease of building it. It just seems like a lot of work to build a typical roof
 
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Old 12-28-15, 08:35 PM
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Cut the top of the front and back studs at the angle you want the roof. Fasten your stud plates and set the rafters on top of the stud plate. Fasten the rafters using framing angle plates. This eliminates having to notch the rafters. You could toe-nail the rafters but I think the angle plates screwed on are easier/sturdier. Best to rip a bevel on the stud plate edge to make it square with the outside face of the stud so the siding has a flat surface.

Very crude drawing to try to explain what I mean.
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Last edited by ray2047; 12-28-15 at 08:59 PM.
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Old 12-29-15, 06:22 AM
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Roof

If you go with Ray's method above, be sure to build in such a way that each rafter is directly above a stud. A single top plate is not sufficient support for the rafters.
 
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Old 12-29-15, 07:20 AM
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If you use the birdsmouth approach for nesting the rafters onto the walls, then you can build the back wall and the two side walls all the same height. The end rafter will be above the end end wall, but being only 5' deep the triangular void is no different than a stud bay and if you wanted you could add a support in the middle. You can see in my picture that I used an overhang in front and read and just a 2x4 width extra on each side. I think the overhang looks better and in front it keeps the rain off of the door.

Bud
 
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Old 12-29-15, 08:06 AM
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Awesome thank you all for helping!
 
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Old 12-29-15, 08:52 AM
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be sure to build in such a way that each rafter is directly above a stud.
Good point. I missed that detail in my explanation.

Birds mouth can be the easiest way to go but in sixty years of wood butchering I've yet to cut a really good birds mouth so I have developed alternatives.
 
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Old 12-29-15, 03:40 PM
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A multi-pitched roof need not be difficult. For a shed, you create a template of two pieces at the angles you desire and lock them together with a plywood gusset. Make them all on the ground and lift them into place one at a time and toenail them in place. Use a 1x3 set across them to steady them in place. The plywood sheathing would hold it all firm for you. If you want to review this technique, look up a shed kit that you can buy from the box store and look at he directions to build. Really pretty simple and you will not loose most of the headroom you will with a single pitched roof.
 

Last edited by czizzi; 12-29-15 at 04:36 PM.
  #18  
Old 12-29-15, 04:23 PM
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What zz said is correct and sheds are a great place to learn. Beyond the basics there are many little steps you learn to take to simplify the construction and minimize waste. If you designed something to use a 49" piece of plywood you would have a bunch of 47" scraps. Keeping the seams on the studs and rafters is a must, a step that you realize more acutely at the end of your project.

But, a single slope still works and can look very good.

Bud
 
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