Repairing a raised pergola

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Old 09-20-16, 07:31 AM
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Repairing a raised pergola

This seems to fall between this subforum and landscaping so apologies if not in correct place. I did however feel this question could just as easily apply to a raised garden shed.

I have recently moved to the Welsh Borders, a lot wetter than my previous location in Suffolk. I have a very steep garden and a pergola has been built at the top. Although a lovely addition the hardcore underneath has clearly showed movement and has pushed out the sleepers at the front. I have started to remove the loose sleepers and note the hardcore underneath is a damp mess and the damp atmosphere is affecting the timbers which are covered with mould. Fortunately the underlying wood does still feel sound. The sleepers themselves have also rotted significantly highlighting the significant damp.

I am a little puzzled why the underneath would be packed with hardcore which perhaps is ignorance on my part. I am more inclined to remove the hard core and rotten damp sleepers. Treat all the underlying wood and replace the front with removable slats with gaps between for decorative purpose. By doing so, damp could be minimised and air circulation will be encourage and each year I can check for any repair work on the structure and keep it all well treated.

I will try to upload some pictures shortly which may be easier for you to visualise the problem.

I would appreciate others opinions on the role of the hardcore.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 07:44 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

What is hardcore? ......... http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 09-20-16, 07:52 AM
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What's sleepers?
In the US sleepers are what's used to build a raised floor over an existing floor.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 08:11 AM
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Photos of pergola

This is the pergola intact. You cannot see from this view but the sleepers at the front moved forward significantly since this shot
Name:  Pergola intact.jpg
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Size:  27.4 KB

This is with some of the dislodged sleepers removed
Name:  Front of pergola.jpg
Views: 143
Size:  49.4 KB

This is a closer view of what is underneath including the mould on the wood
Name:  Underneath Pergola.jpg
Views: 121
Size:  39.4 KBName:  Hardcore under pergola.jpg
Views: 103
Size:  35.5 KB
 
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Old 09-20-16, 08:15 AM
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Railway sleepers although I suspect cheap versions were used for this.
Hardcore is pieces of concrete/brick, basically building rubble.

Thanks for your attention to my post.

Roy
 
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Old 09-20-16, 09:30 AM
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With the leaning corner post and the visible rot on the middle post I'd be inclined to tear it down and start over.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 10:04 AM
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You are probably right but would you have the hardcore in the space below or have it free to allow air circulation. I do not fully appreciate why the void is filled with hardcore. Even if I rebuild from scratch I would need to understand the role of the hardcore, if any. From my perspective, all it does is harbour damp.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 10:08 AM
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Unless there is something behind the ruble that it is somehow shoring up - I see no need for it. But sometimes there are different building practices in different areas of the world so it wouldn't hurt to check locally for more info.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 11:48 AM
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Thanks very helpful. I will also place on a British forum and see what comes of it.
 
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