Freeze proof/resistant padlock?

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Old 12-08-16, 07:13 AM
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Freeze proof/resistant padlock?

My small barn has typical swing out doors. They are secured with typical hasp and padlock.

The lock is a combination type because it's more practical but every winter it freezes and if I have to get in the barn I have to thaw the lock with a torch.

I've tried various lubricants, and I do put one of those foam insulators made for putting over outdoor faucets over the lock, but it still freezes. There's no overhang so it gets full brunt of the weather, except for the foam insulator.

I see they make different types of all weather padlocks but reviews are mixed. Can anyone here recommend a lock that will be more resistant to freezing? Prefer combination but could live with a key, at least for the winter when I don't go in the barn that often.
 
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Old 12-08-16, 07:16 AM
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My barn/shop has a similar set up with no real protection for the padlock. With mine if/when the lock freezes heating the key with a lighter is usually sufficient to open the padlock. Generally only an issue if it rains prior to getting below freezing.
 
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Old 12-08-16, 04:06 PM
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The only lubricant I use in my locks is graphite. It won't freeze. Now, water eking its way down the hasp will freeze, and I think that is the culprit. It happens on my jobsite trailer all winter. American Lock has hidden shackle locks, but they require a key. Seems water would just shed off the casing on those.
 
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Old 12-09-16, 03:54 AM
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I just now comprehended Paul said combination lock
 
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Old 12-09-16, 07:51 AM
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Thanks...graphite is what I tried first. I believe you are right Larry when you say the problem is water seeping in down the shackle. The little lock wheels don't freeze (they face down) but once combo is set the shackle won't open. I'll look for hidden shackle locks, and maybe put a wide rubber flap over the lock instead of the foam insulator, maybe that will keep the water off better.
 
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Old 12-09-16, 10:47 AM
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Would setting the lock upside down help?
 
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Old 12-10-16, 12:05 AM
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Can you make a small "roof" out of scrap metal to protect the lock and prevent it from getting wet?

I know everyone says graphite for locks but for outdoor stuff I use old WD-40. When the lock starts getting stiff I give it a squirt. If it feels gritty like it's attracted some dirt I give it a long squirt to clean the lock out. And, since I keep the can inside, if the lock freezes spraying it with the warm WD-40 soon gets it thawed and working. But WD-40 does a surprisingly good job of preventing locks from freezing.
 
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Old 12-10-16, 03:19 AM
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That's because it is Water Displacement formula 40.
 
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