Shed durability question.

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Old 01-03-17, 02:09 PM
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Shed durability question.

Hi there,

we bought a house last year that has a playhouse in the back. It look pretty well constructed, and is on a concrete block. The wood on top looks pretty rotten though.

It has power sockets but they don't work.

I'm wondering what's best to do with it. I'd like to turn it into a small space for some guitar playing - get an electrician to get it powered again etc, but I'm just wondering how I know whether it's worth it - how I know whether it's going to fall apart etc. If it's not, I might look at getting something built afresh.

The wood inside looks good, apart from under the windows where it looks wet. Though, to be honest, I haven't a clue what I'm looking for apart from that.

Any advice or tips would be muchly appreciated. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-03-17, 02:38 PM
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Welcome to the forum. The playhouse looks to be well constructed - as a playhouse. I'd start there and get it in somewhat better condition before I start anew. Then, I'd use it and decide whether to keep it, modify it, or start over. At that time, you'd be sufficiently knowledgeable about the structure to make it into what would suit you best - perhaps a higher ceiling, some acoustics, or a change in shape (round?).

You don't show where you live so I can't tell whether heat is something you may want, possibly electric. But the place is almost certainly not insulated so that could be a factor.

Of course the roof is in need of repair but that looks to be fairly simple repair although replacing it is probably the better option. On the roof, though, there doesn't seem to be an overhang and water may be getting in. In that regard, consider sending another photo showing another side.

On electric, it's possible there was never any run to the playhouse even though you have an outlet.
 
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Old 01-03-17, 02:51 PM
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Thank you so much for the advice. I'm in Portland Oregon so cold / wet is a factor for 8 months of the year.

I was thinking of running an outdoor power cable in, using a heater and "using it" this week to see how well it warmed up and retained the heat.

I'm looking at sound reduction options so they may help insulate it as well (i.e. reflective bubble wrap) but I wanted to see whether the whole thing needed tearing down. Here's the roof from the other side.
 
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Old 01-03-17, 03:00 PM
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Looks to be a decent shed but it definitely needs a new roof. Does everything else feel solid?
 
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Old 01-03-17, 03:52 PM
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Thanks. Yes it feels really solid. And apart from the damp wood below the windows, and cold, it's a really nice space.

Another thing, although the roof is slanted, the ceiling inside is flat, so I'm not sure what would be between the two. Any idea what type of wood is on the inside? And how I might insulate it?

In terms of replacing the roof, I'll look into that. I might try it myself (after research). I might even look at getting some carpet in there and turning it into a tiny office / jam space once I've got it sealed up and working. Thanks again.
 
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Old 01-03-17, 04:01 PM
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There would be a small attic space above the flat part of the ceiling.
might be spruce or fir.
 
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Old 01-03-17, 04:49 PM
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I think it is definitely worth saving. A roof is everything. Get a new one on ASAP and do not use wood shakes, they are a waste of time IMO. Steel or laminated asphalt are the way to go.
 
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Old 01-03-17, 05:07 PM
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Ah right. good to know. There's no access to it, I guess I'll find out when I remove the old shingles. Thank you!
 
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Old 01-03-17, 05:10 PM
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Great. Am looking into the laminated asphalt now, they look great. Would you think I need roof deck protection under the shingles? Or is that unnecessary for a playhouse.
 
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Old 01-03-17, 07:14 PM
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laminated asphalt could be very nice. Personally, I'm a stickler on doing things right. Particularly if you're doing some research, willing to spend on materials like laminated asphalt, and considering doing it yourself, why not spend the extra time and make it right. That includes some drip edge flashing which seems to be missing in your roof.

Also, your last photos indicate the siding extends out onto the fascia (bargeboard). To me, this appears to be a place where water can get in so consider a design change at those points. Finally, make certain that trim is caulked because I'd be concerned about water getting in.

Finally, consider finding a roofer willing to have you assist. That would enable you to get it done right and pick up some information along the way. Your roofing supplier may be able to give you a suggestion.
 
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