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Moving to steel building for the storage of beer barrels a good idea?

Moving to steel building for the storage of beer barrels a good idea?

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  #1  
Old 02-20-17, 03:27 AM
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Moving to steel building for the storage of beer barrels a good idea?

I am planning to construct a steel building for storage of the barrels near my old wooden shed.

The brewery was started by my grandfather. It's now up to me to take the legacy forward. We have now a good brand presence in the locality and in the neighboring towns and cities. I require more room for the storage of the barrels.

There is a company that builds custom agricultural steel buildings nearby and I thought it would be easier and cost effective. But, I doubt whether it would change the quality of our beer. I hope this can be avoided if the humidity and the temperature inside the steel building are controlled properly.

I would appreciate your opinion on this. I don't want to make a bad decision now when our business is booming.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-20-17, 04:20 AM
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The style of building does not matter.

This pretty much sums it up:
this can be avoided if the humidity and the temperature inside the steel building are controlled properly
A suggestion is to not only seek advice from the building supplier.
My experience with those companies is that they often over simplify HVAC needs.

One feature that would provide temperature stability in a metal building is in-floor heat.
Along with very even heating is the fact that a heated slab along with the building perimeter are normally very well insulated.
 
  #3  
Old 02-20-17, 04:29 AM
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Most of these buildings will have a "diaper" type insulation installed as the panels go up on ceilings and walls. If using in-floor heat, be sure not to store anything in contact with it as the heat will telegraph to those items. I would check to see what R value the installed insulation has, as I think you may need better than diaper since your product is stored long term. You will need not only to regulate the heat/cool, but humidity as well, so it may be a daunting task, but doable.
 
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Old 02-20-17, 04:47 AM
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I can add that a common strategy in our area for in-floor heating is to heat the slab to a few degrees lower than where you want the building to be and then use space heaters in your fuel of choice to bring up the space to the desired temperature.

This reduces the effect that Larry mentioned and can give you very stable temperature control.
 
  #5  
Old 02-20-17, 05:08 AM
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I have a large steel building similar to what you are considering. It has the typical "diaper" type insulation which helps but is truly inadequate if you want to maintain a stable temperature, especially in your climate. I would look into upgraded insulation that the manufacturer offers. Because of the way the buildings are constructed most standard insulations can not be used without framing out the interior. Basically building a building within the steel outer shell which adds greatly to the cost. So, it's probably most economical to buy whatever better insulation is available from the steel building company.
 
  #6  
Old 02-20-17, 07:12 PM
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Alright. Thank you, everyone, for the detailed explanation on the "diaper" insulation for the steel buildings.
 
  #7  
Old 06-07-18, 02:15 AM
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Most important components to be able to maintain a proper temperature for your building is through its insulation. Having a damaged or even a weakened insulation can start harmful moisture to build up in your steel building. This will also dramatically decrease the building’s effectiveness when it comes to its cooling and heating system, which can cause driving up your energy costs.
 
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