10x10 shed framing using off-size lumber

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  #1  
Old 07-02-19, 06:13 PM
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10x10 shed framing using off-size lumber

Hi all. I'm planning out a new 10x10 shed. I have a stack of 2x6 dimensional lumbers left over from another project, about 45 pieces. I'm wondering if it's ok to split these 2x6 lumber into 2x3 for framing, instead of using regular 2x4. What do you guys think? Thanks so much for any advise or suggestion.
 
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Old 07-02-19, 06:53 PM
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If you have ever looked at the end of a board you would see that most boards have mainly heartwood in the middle of the board. The heartwood keeps the board straight like the tree originally was because the grain wraps around it. If you cut a board in half, you are usually slicing the heartwood in half which means the board is more likely to warp.

And if you plan on wiring the shed, you won't be able to run Romex through studs that are only 2 11/16 wide unless you put no nail plates everywhere.
 
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Old 07-02-19, 07:19 PM
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XSleeper, that's something I hadn't thought about for sure. Would the warping be severe if I place 1/4" sheathing on the exterior side? I guess another option is to not split them into 2x3, but into 2x4 with waste trims. Would that be better in term of reducing warping? Thanks a lot.
 

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Old 07-02-19, 07:22 PM
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1/4" sheathing isn't going to have any holding power at all. Yes it would be better to turn them into 2x4s if you insist on ripping them.
 
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Old 07-02-19, 07:41 PM
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How about placing noggings between the studs, be it 2x3 or 2x4. Would that stabilize the warping? Cheers.
 
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Old 07-02-19, 07:48 PM
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Blocking will help if there is any twisting. Heavier sheathing will help the studs resist bowing. Generally you examine all your studs, mark which way they are bowed and then as you frame, turn them so that if any are bowed, they all bow in the same direction... such as outward.
 
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Old 07-02-19, 08:11 PM
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XSleeper. Thank you so much for all your thoughts and comments. I'm going to sleep on it before making a decision. Ultimately it's a shed, not a house, so some level of imperfection is acceptable. And I want to use up the left over material and minimize additional cost. At least now I know the risk and ways to mitigate them. Really appreciate it.

If there's any other pit fall you guys can think of, please do let me know. Cheers.
 
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Old 07-03-19, 01:45 AM
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Splitting 45 boards into smaller boards, how many hours of work is that going to take?

Just build with what you have!
 
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Old 07-03-19, 02:29 AM
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IF I was to rip the 2x6s into 2x3s I'd only use them on the non load baring walls. Marq makes a good point about the time spent ripping the boards. One nice thing about having 2x6 walls [if you don't intend to cover them on the inside] is blocking will make nice shelves.
 
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Old 07-03-19, 03:17 AM
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Yeah, sounds like way too much time and effort to me to rip that many of them. Depending on species, how, and how long the have been stored, you may as well budget for a new blade. And you'd obviously need to utilize an outfeed table of adequate length or other means of support. Nothing wrong with using them though, so I would buy new 10' plates, and use what you have for studs, jambs, headers, etc.
 
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Old 07-03-19, 03:34 AM
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For a 10' by 10' shed I don't think there would be any load bearing problems if you frame it with 2x3's either purchased new or ripped from your leftover 2x6s.

You could space 2x6 studs at 24" centers compared with 2x4s at 16" centers.
 
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