Simpson Titen anchors for gazebo columns?


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Old 10-04-22, 12:06 AM
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Simpson Titen anchors for gazebo columns?

Hello folks,

I am planning to use "Simpson Strong-Tie Titen HD 3/8-in x 5-in Head Silver Concrete Anchors".

My carpenter buddy recommends these. However, he does not have much experience installing gazebos, so he asked me to check around to make sure they can do the job.

Here are a few questions:
  • I read in a different thread that even a 1.25" screw would be adequate. Is 5" too long?
  • These screws go in without a sleeve. Is that OK? (We tried a different brand with a sleeve, and it did not work.)
  • We will also use some concrete epoxy in the hole. I read elsewhere that the hole should be larger than the screw diameter. My friend thinks that it should be the size that the manufacturer recommends. I told him that inserting the screw and tightening would get almost all of the epoxy out, eliminating any benefit from it. What do you think?
Thanks!

Al
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BTW, my gazebo is similar to this:


 
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Old 10-04-22, 12:22 AM
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What exactly are you screwing down? Post brackets? You don't use epoxy with those screws. I also don't think you would be able to fully embed a 5" screw in concrete, you would need a pretty hefty drill. ...and the Titan HD are for dry, interior use or temporary outdoor applications.

And their instructions say: "Drill a hole in the base material using a carbide drill bit the same diameter as the nominal diameter of the anchor to be installed."

So for a 3/8" screw you drill a 3/8" hole.


You should probably clarify exactly what it is you are bolting down, and whether it's a flanged post or a post base anchor. And how thick your surface material is. (What good is a 5" screw if the concrete is only 3 1/2" thick?) Fasteners and anchors have to meet uplift calculations, which we have no way of knowing. Structures like this must also be permitted and inspected in many locations.
 
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Old 10-04-22, 12:46 PM
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Hello XSleeper,

The posts come with brackets like in the photo. below.

BTW, I am aware of a discussion here that these are not the best for securing the gazebo. In that discussion a bracket with a hole in the center was mentioned.

The concrete is at least 10" thick at the back and more in the front. These are concrete blocks we poured just for the posts. See the second photo.





 
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Old 10-05-22, 12:21 PM
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The problem with any type of mount on a flat slab is that it just doesn't have the rigidity of a post that is buried into the ground.

A buddy of mine built a gazebo last year and had anchors as you mention, I dont recall the brand but they had 3-4 big bolts going down into the slab. The brackets are rock solid but the structure just isnt and he's not happy with the outcome!
 
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Old 10-06-22, 10:53 AM
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Hello Marq1,

I heard about this issue from others.

If you are in an area with high winds, it could be a major issue. However, for us laymen, it is difficult to define what wind speed really would tear apart the structure, leaving the brackets intact.

I have seen wind tests being done on this brand, but there is very little technical information. The testing lab has not given any wind speeds, nor any information on screws...

Thanks!

 
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Old 10-06-22, 12:15 PM
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You would probably be better off using a wedge anchor. Here is an example.

 
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Old 10-08-22, 11:38 PM
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Hello Xsleeper,

This is the first one we tried. It did not work. When we started tightening the screw, the part that is supposed to expand started moving up and the screw also started coming out!

That's when we considered the more beefy lag shields like the one below. However, I decided to ask around a bit more and discovered this forum.

Have you ever used these lag shields? If so, are they any better?

Thanks!

Home Depot page on this is here:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Prime-Li...1684/310149748

 
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Old 10-08-22, 11:51 PM
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The wedge anchors are what you want to use, they are the types used for anchoring buildings to slabs so they are the most secure!
 
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Old 10-09-22, 11:08 AM
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Hello Marq1,

Theoretically, wedge anchors are good. However, in our case, it did not work... My guess is that the part that is supposed to open up and push against the concrete did not perform.

The "lag shield" in my previous post does the same thing. I am guessing that it will perform better. To test it, I am planning to use one. I'll let you folks know of the results.

Thanks!
 
 

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