Sunroom


  #1  
Old 01-29-02, 05:51 PM
LDS
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Cool Sunroom

Wife and I are very interested in adding a sunroom to the back of our house. Anyone out there with information about the positive or negative aspects of installing a sunroom? Would appreciate all replies in reference to this subject. Thank you in advance.

LDS from Iowa
 
  #2  
Old 01-30-02, 07:18 PM
L
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Location: Arlington, WA
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Just what do you have in mind when you use the term "sunroom"? You may want to check the website for Texas Aluminum Industries. They offer patio rooms and sunrooms, be be aware, that these ARE NOT a DIY project. They are only installed by authorized contractors, and for good reason. I have installed about 30 or 40 of them, and have 3 that were done as a DIY project. NONE of mine have leaks. The same cannot be said about the other three.
 
  #3  
Old 02-08-02, 06:10 AM
brewmanca
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sunroom

Check out Screen Den. They have roll-up PVC panels to turn a porch into a sunroom easily. The PVC can be paired with screens to keep the bugs out as well. I have installed well over 100 of these systems and have had no call backs yet! www.screenden.com
 
  #4  
Old 02-16-02, 08:22 PM
w russ
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Thumbs up sunroom beginnings

I am also looking at building a sunroom. I have already gotten some estimates and if you haven't be prepared for some big numbers. We are looking at a 10x21 with a slopeing roof( flat as they call it) and one outside door on one end. The rest of the room will have slidding windows for better air movement in the spring and fall. The estimates so far have been from 15K to 25K plus concrete work. I have decided on building it myself. I already have nine 36"x78" plate solar windows with new wood frames. In the area you are at have you decided on how much of the year you were going to use the area. Will you be adding heat and air? If you are do not use vinyl windows, they will not hold up to the tempature changes. I'm in the process of working out my drawings now, so I'll be ready this spring to get started.
 
  #5  
Old 02-16-02, 08:53 PM
L
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w russ, $15 to $25K for a 200 sq.ft. 'patio room' (flat roof, rather than a curved roof sunroom), should just about be the upper and lower end prices. If you decide to do-it-yourself, fine, but, be aware, that to qualify as a patio room (as opposed to conditioned living space) you need to be 65% open on the longest wall and one adjacent wall. Be careful when you choose your windows. BOTH panes must be removable to meet this criteria.
 
  #6  
Old 02-17-02, 05:32 PM
w russ
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lefty
I do not understand what is so important about how the room is considered. Is Calf. different or does it have something to do with taxes. I checked with our code department and they were only concerned if it was going to be inclosed.
 
  #7  
Old 02-18-02, 05:13 PM
L
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Bill, bldg. codes vary greatly from one place to the next. In CA, sunroom (or patio room) can be built to 'lower' standards than an addition to the living space of your home. They don't have to meet the same energy efficiency requirements, nor are they taxed the same as living space additions. They are concidered "non-conditioned space" (you can't duct heat or A/C into them). Nor do we have to meet the electrical requirements of having an outlet every 12' (although we can do that). But, to qualify for this "lower" standard, they have to meet that part of the I.C.B.O. code that calls for them the be 65% open on the longest wall and one adjacent wall to a height of 80". To meet that requirement, BOTH panes of the windows have got to be removable. There are other differences, but I am sure that your local bldg. dept. will help you through the entire process and be happy to guide you to make sure you do it "their way" if you decide to do this yourself. Just be aware that you cannot get the same material that a qualified contractor can (a home owner IS NOT going to put up a T.A.I. or Alumet room), and if you do decide to DIY, you have no warranty against leaks or other problems related to the installation.
 
  #8  
Old 02-20-02, 06:30 PM
brewmanca
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Hello,

I feel it is necessary to explain the system I recommended from Screen Den. These panels are removable and are designed to be installed after the sunroom/screened porch is constructed. As long as the panels are removable, the structure is not considered as 'living space'. I have installed this system for many homeowners in Canada and have found it to be very durable and long lasting. The temperature fluctuations up here do not affect the vinyl as previously stated. The vinyl is cold crack resistant to close to -20F. The sun has not affected any of the panels I have installed. Most of my installation's have been on 3 season porches and gazebo's. If one of the panels should be damaged by sharp objects etc..., they are economical to replace as well. I find this system to be a great alternative to expensive glass sunrooms. The panels can be rolled up and out of the way when they are not needed, either together or individually. I must say that a permanent porch and triple track windows are nice but the increase in price is considerable and with being classified as 'living' space, the new sunroom will continue to cost money for years to come.

Screen Den's system can easily be installed by most homeowners
by simply following basic instructions. www.screenden.com

Hope this helps!

Larry Brewman.
 
 

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