Outside Wood Boilers

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  #1  
Old 12-31-08, 07:15 PM
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Smile Outside Wood Boilers

Hello all, I am new to this forum, I was browsing the green energy section, and noticed no mention yet of burning wood. I recently purchased and outside wood boiler system and I Love it. As I have read, burning wood is still an old favorite for green energy, burning wood is Carbon Neutral, the wood releases the same amount of carbon that it took in as a tree, so no harm to the enviroment. Any comments?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-01-09, 02:22 PM
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Maybe great for you but as one who lives just North of one of them I hate it. The smoke sometimes blankets my yard. Sometimes we think the neighbors house is on fire from all the smoke.
Now maybe it is the type wood they burn or maybe the smokestack is not tall enough. I do not know. All I know is they have had it 6 years now and we hate it. When they first got it we were in a house with the front door on the south side toward them. An older house, we could not seal the door well enough to keep the smoke smell out. We ended up moving the front door to the east side of the house to keep the smell out.
When we built our new home just a little north of the old home we also put the door on the east side just because of the neighbor's woodburning boiler.
 
  #3  
Old 01-01-09, 02:52 PM
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Wood smoke from outdoor boilers can be very annoying. They burn constantly year round without relief. Some areas have outlawed them. For instance, they are not allowed in the state of Washington. Short vent stacks do not allow for good dispersion of smoke. When water reaches 180 degrees, it cycles down and produces lots of smoke until it's time to fire up again. Smoke is not healthy for those who breathe it or for the environment.

Rock Falls, IL, has proposed an ordinance: "The proposed ordinance will also require the stoves be at least 25 feet inside a property line and 100 feet from any residence that does not have an outdoor wood furnace. In addition, the chimneys of wood-burning furnaces will need to be at least two feet taller than the peak of any roof within 300 feet that does not have an outdoor wood furnace." Alternative Energy Retailer Content / Industry Watch / Illinois City Proposes Wood-Burning Stove Ordinance

Make sure you are not in violation of any ordinance with outdoor wood boiler. If you live near and outdoor wood boiler, you may want to pursue local government to ban or, at least, place limitations on placement as in Rock Falls, IL.
 
  #4  
Old 01-01-09, 04:35 PM
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I totally agree with the last two posts, it does matter where you live if it is a good idea to burn wood or not. I live in a small town in Missouri with no ordinances really to speak of, about 400 people, most of my nieghbors next to me burn wood, some inside wood stoves some outside boilers, so I guess I fit right in. My stove has a chimney about 15 feet up, double insulated pipe. I am about 150 feet away from the closest nieghbor, but he burns wood also. I did the install with his help and guidance so no conflicts there. I work in a factory 12 hours a day, 6 to 7 days a week, I dont even have time to cut my own wood so I buy it from the neighbors.
I agree some wood stoves are not fully designed properly, I investigated this idea for a year before I settled on the model I have. I dont think I can mention brand names here, but if your neighbor has one of those stainless steel ones with the short little stack about 2 feet above the stove, I apologize to you for him, he didnt do his research. I made sure mine was going to have a tall stack to dissapate the smoke properly and so far everything looks good. The only time mine smokes alot is when I first load it, the neighbor said beacuse it is burning the bark, once it gets going, you dont see alot of smoke, and when it chokes down, there is barely a little puff coming out the top which dissaptes quickly.
As far as burning all year around, I am still thinking about that. Here most people stay inside during the winter so not much problem with smoke complaints, but in the summer we alll hangout outside, soooo, I am investigating solar hot water heat. My stove heats my domestic water also, it was a liberating feeling when I shut the gas valve off i have to admit. I am thinking about hooking a solar hot water heat into the stove during the summer, it is already plumbed in to heat the domestic water so I think the concept will work. Any suggestions about solar water heaters would be very much appreciated, I would like to build my own. I am thinking of building a lean to by the stove for the wood, so I think a roof slanting to the south would be the perfect place for a solar heater, circulated right into the stove. Any comments??
 
  #5  
Old 01-01-09, 04:44 PM
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Here's a good place to start your research on solar water heaters. Dept. of Energy: EERE Consumer's Guide: Solar Water Heaters
 
  #6  
Old 01-02-09, 10:21 AM
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Yep you got it right. A 2 foot smoke stack. He is over 100 yards away now from my new home. The old house was 1/2 that distance. We have no regulations here. Nearest town is 1 1/4 mile away. He is a great neighbor just hate his smoke. Doubt he would extend the chimney even if I asked. We just watch and laugh when it is humid and no wind and all the smoke is hovering around his house like a cloud. Just wish there were more of those days. He has to know it is a problem when that happens but maybe not what the fix is. Seems like when I asked him about it before he called the place where he bought it and they said a taller chimney would make it not work correctly. Not get enough draw or something.
 
  #7  
Old 01-02-09, 06:58 PM
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Guys I am no expert on this I'm going to say what I have heard. Some company has a unit that has a ceramic fire box. It also has some kind of air jets inside. They are so clean burning they make NO SMOKE. I don't no what company they are but I do know they have the patient for a couple more years so no body can copy theirs. Might be something to look into.
 
  #8  
Old 01-02-09, 08:07 PM
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let him know that a taller chimney will make it draw better not worse. the taller chimney the more the air flow over it will cause it to draw well. also the shape of the cap will affect the draw of the chimney.

if we're not supposed to eat animals why are they made out of meat?
 
  #9  
Old 01-21-09, 10:32 PM
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Ladies and gentlemen:

The thing to understand is that OWBs should NOT in anyway be compared to any other wood burning device (ie indoor wood stoves, chimney on fireplace and etc.)

OWBs are not safe because of one simple thing. The way they are engineered. They are designed to smoke and smolder. Also you cannot factor in the human aspect of using and OWB. Odds are people who use indoor wood devices don't burn trash, yard wastes, and other debris in their fireplace inside their home.

I want to share with all of you my story. Please click on the links below and please view what has happened personally with my family. I also want to share with all of you the awareness of how big of an issue this is in our country.

Freedom of Air - Public Awareness of Outdoor Wood Boilers
MySpace.com - Air - 30 - Male - Illinois - www.myspace.com/freedomofair
Burning Issues

Check out the OWB brochure here: http://burningissues.org/car-www/pdf...chure-2008.pdf
 
  #10  
Old 01-22-09, 06:02 AM
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I have had a Outdoor wood burner for about 5 years now. The hardy. Love it. Works great! Endless hot water and heat. As for the smoke problem. Thats what you get for living so close to someone. The smoke doesn't bother me and its maybe 20-30 foot from the house.
 
  #11  
Old 01-23-09, 10:10 PM
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Driving through rural Appalachia, you can see lots of outdoor wood boilers. Houses sit on acreage and are far apart. The OWB's tend not to be a problem for neighbors in this type of setting. It's a wonderful source of heat for these people. Many cut their own wood on their own property. Many live off the fat of the land.

As indicated above, where there are neighbor's near by or in an urban setting as in Air Freedom's post, then OWB's can be problematic. They are certainly not appropriate in an urban setting as in Air Freedom's video. This OWB would not meet minimum setback and stack height as most areas have imposed.

The distance from neighbors and the height of the smoke stack are factors that contribute to OWB's being problematic for neighbors. If you have a problem with neighbor's OWB, then get proactive in your community government and educate them about other areas in the country who have banned or restricted OWBs.

Some areas require permits and have particulate emission standards in addition to setback and stack height requirements, as well as the boiler unit having to be certified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency Outdoor Wood-Fired Hydronic Heater Program for emission standards. They limit operation from October 15 to April 15. They limit what can be burned in the OWB. And, OWB can not be operated as a nuisance. And, this would make the OWB fall under nuisance laws, which may be an avenue to pursue by those who find OWBs to be problematic. Going to the county health department and requesting an air quality test to test emissions is another avenue.

Neighbors feud over outdoor wood boiler - Jackson Cit Pat - MLive.com

OWBs are great in the right setting. But, in areas where neighbors find them to be a threat to air quality and health and their own property, then it is best to pursue changes in ordinances either to ban or at least impose restrictions as mentioned above.
 
  #12  
Old 01-24-09, 02:19 AM
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I read on line somewere that to get the maximum efficiency and the least smoke out of a woodburner, you need to run it near full capacity and keep the stack temperature between 200- 400 degrees. These high temperatures will cause the smoke to burn, thus greatly reducing the emissions and creosote buidup.
This may not be practical if the woodburner heat output is too high for the installation requirements: ie the room will get too hot.
Anyway, you might want to mention these facts to your neibors.
 

Last edited by szm200; 01-24-09 at 03:36 AM.
  #13  
Old 02-02-09, 06:47 PM
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A guy I know that owns a sawmill burns his own wood blocks to heat his house. He's got some kind of system that transfers the heat from the outdoor furnace into his house. Some of his friends use a similar system too, with his wood. I'm sure it's a great deal if you can find cheap wood!
 
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