Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Wind power, whole home approach


Pendragon's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,835
FL

01-23-10, 03:43 PM   #1  
Wind power, whole home approach

Looking for someone who has installed a wind generator that has substantially replaced their utility supplied power.

What did you install (size, model, etc), where are you located, what was your average power usage before, after, etc.

 
Sponsored Links
Bud9051's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 9,772
ME

01-23-10, 03:53 PM   #2  
I looked at some DIY small units and they just don't put out enough power. The home sized units that I could purchase would need a major cash investment, plus the house demand would have to be significantly reduced.

With the improvements in electrical use by appliances, once you switch out the major units, hot water to solar, cook stove to gas, and all of the lighting to high efficiency, there isn't a lot to save, thus difficult to justify.

Now if you are living off the grid, I would look at some DIY projects. Here is some fun reading: BuildItSolar: Solar energy projects for Do It Yourselfers to save money and reduce pollution

Bud

 
Pendragon's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,835
FL

01-23-10, 04:12 PM   #3  
I was looking at some of the ReDriven units. I've got an email out to them, but apparently the only person that can answer questions is out on vacation. Silly canucks.

Anywho, the 10kw unit is about 20 grand, not including the tower (no mention on cost of the tower). I particularly liked the tower, as it can be raised and lowered hydraulically for servicing the generator, or in my case, lowered for inbound hurricanes.

*Assuming* that model could replace my PoCo, I'd see a payback in about 7 years, after that it would be essentially free power.

Except for central heat/air and the electric water heater (which I'll be switching to gas when I can), my electrical demand is pretty low, as I can run my whole house, sans the heat pump), on a 6500 watt generator and it's not even taxed.
Unfortunately, not much I can do about the heat pump, it's just a big hog.

I'm still looking for some CT sensors that will fit over my 200a SE entrance cable so I can find out what my actual load really is.

 
Bud9051's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 9,772
ME

01-23-10, 04:27 PM   #4  
I don't see the payback. I have friends in Florida and $100 a month is high. Even if I give you $200 a month, the $20,000 plus tower, plus controls or what ever always pops up, a true payback would be over 15 years. The only thing we can't figure in is the future cost of energy and I have to admit, being prepared does feel nice .

Bud

 
Pendragon's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,835
FL

01-23-10, 08:19 PM   #5  
Actually my leveled bill is just a touch over $300 a month right now.

I'm averaging about 65 kwh a day, I sure wish my bill was $100!

Since I'm not sure how they are calculating the power, I don't know which unit would be appropriate. On the surface, the 10 kw unit sounds like it wouldn't even handle a sixth of my power needs, yet I've read stories all over about folks with these units that have them with so much power left over they are selling it back to the poco.

 
mcircus's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 60
WI

02-05-10, 07:35 AM   #6  
Not windy in Florida

Florida is a poor location for a wind turbine. I'dd whittle down costs in other cheaper ways. Solar siphon water heater is perfect for florida. If there's any water nearby use it as a thermomass for the heatpump. Insulate, shade, trees etc

 
TTASHA's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 176
FL

02-14-10, 08:43 AM   #7  
We used to have SUN in Florida

Why not solar? Cost is one good reason, however, I recently had a 5kw solar panel installation. One great thing is the 30% tax rebate in 2009/10.

The system is connected to the grid so I get credit when I send power back to Florida Progress. Was I surprised when I saw the meter running backward? Yes because I didn't know such a small installation would make enough power to do this.

Since my installation a month ago we have had very, very cold days and very, very little sun.

This system also provides a connection to the internet to view all the panels and the output per day, month, etc. This is monitored by a company called ENPHASE (pv array). I can see each panel and the enery produced.

If anyone is interested I will tell you how this turns out at the end of the coldest/cloudy days we have had in 20 years.Beer 4U2

 
esalman's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 196
MA

02-14-10, 09:20 AM   #8  
I agree with TTASHA, the sun shine state would be a great location for solar. I'm looking into installing a wind turbine. it is very breezy her in shrewsbury, specially during the winter months. Because the heat is on and the light are turned on for a longer periods of time my electric bill in winter is higher than the summer.

 
Search this Thread