remington power fastener

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-08-03, 11:53 AM
jthorning
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
remington power fastener

I'll likely purchase a Remington power fastener for fastening of basement framing and other stuff for basement project. Couple questions first:
1. I guess trial & error will determine load/fastener used for framing. Any recommendations on required depth?
2. If I want to fasten a window for example, can I set the depth so I don't destroy the window or whatever item I'm trying to fasten?

Thanks for your reply, John
 
  #2  
Old 03-08-03, 07:24 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
jthorning,

I would not advise you to purchase a ramset for a basement project. You're wasting your money unless you have other things you could use it for. This project would not be a reason to buy one.

It might be better to RENT one and the charges/nails will usually come with it, for a fee of course, but they can direct you on what is usually required for 2x stock to floor.

Look at this link for just an idea on charges and nails available.

http://www.tools-plus.com/rem-powder...cessories.html

I would never use a ramset to fasten a window. You should be installing a wood buck frame and then attaching your window to this with proper "controled" fasteners like nails/screws. I know you would destroy the window for sure. Why would you want to shot the window in? Didn't make a big enough rough-in opening to accommodate wood buck? Trim should be installed the traditional way as well. Reconsider this idea or you will be buying a new window and lots of trim.

Good Luck!
 
  #3  
Old 03-09-03, 12:31 AM
NutAndBoltKing
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
#1). Doug's right; unless you have other things you could use it for, you are wasting your money. Pardon the pun, but I doubt you'll get the bang for your buck.

I frequent garage sales, flea markets, liquidation, bank and government sales, etc and I see a lot of these tools for sale - all hardly used, once or twice maybe, and I almost always hear stories about; a) hand, eye and foot injuries from ricochets, or b) stories about damages it caused to property - walls, blocks, and other materials that were easily ruined or cracked, shattered and split.

As safe as I always try to work, I have even received a ricochet injury using one of my .22 cal Remington 489s. The pin struck rebar and came back at me messing up my finger. A few years back at a mall in Long Island NY a worker was fastening studs to a wall and one of the pins went through the wall and struck a woman working in the Burger King next door - in her head.

If you do choose to buy one I strongly suggest that you wear gloves, and use both eye and hearing protection at all times, and forget about using trial and error to find about the pins and different charges. Read the manual that comes with the tool and read the information sheets in each box or pack of shots and pins. Everything is listed.

#2). As far as the installation of that sash goes; Doug's right about not using a ramset and about the wood bucks, but if your situation forces you to fasten directly to concrete or to block it's best to use expandable fasteners such as rawl plugs, dynabolts, or tapcons. If you're stuck fastening to steel lintels and sills, drill and tap, nothing holds better.
 
  #4  
Old 03-09-03, 01:12 AM
awesomedell's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 2,425
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
rent the tool for your project, I think they're about $25 a day at the yard I regularly use and do wear proper safety equipment

defnitely don't use it to attach a window, I can't see that going anywhere good
 
  #5  
Old 03-09-03, 09:55 AM
jthorning
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the advice fellas, some additional questions/comments though:

1. Purchase is likely since like most DIYers, I'll chip away at the project as time permits, plus I like to finance purchase of different tools by DIYing.
2. Is there a specific depth (eg. 1") that the fastener should penetrate into the wall (poured concrete in my application)? Or (duh) is this simply listed in the instructions?
3. To comment on the windows, I have 2 crappy windows I'll replace. Existing windows are approx 19X32" set/nailed right into roughed-in opening about 2" larger in each dim. The windows are set in a little and either mortar or concrete is filled in around and tapered to fit the window. Should I buy similar sized window and set in place using non-ramset fasteners (seems easier to do this) or bust out the 2" tapered mortar, open up the rough-in area and frame out with treated wood prior to installing new windows?
4. By wood buck, do you mean a simple box frame?
5. Safety is priority #1 on any job, couldn't agree more.

Thanks for your reply. John
 
  #6  
Old 03-09-03, 10:18 AM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
jthorning,

If you are purchasing a new ramset, instruction are included as to what can be used, etc. Instructions are pretty good. Existing conditions dictate what size will be needed. This involves what is to be anchored and into what type of surface. It is a trial by error, if you will, but ususally 2 shots will determine what you need. If concrete is soft or hard determines charge size.

I would totally chip out any mortar or concrete that is currently within the window area now. This mortar surround was done after the fact.

You need to measure the total opening and then determine what type of window you are putting in. If it is a vinyl unit - there is hardware that can be used to attach this to the concrete perimeter. If you are going glass blcok..the same applies. If you are going with a more traditional window, you have the option to install a wood buck (W/T) frame and then install. The mesasurements of this opening will determine the window size needed. Think ahead when doing this as you need to know how the interior and exterior finish is to be done. You can ramset the wood frame in or use anchors and screws. This would apply use anchors and screws for the first two applications.

Hope this helps!
 
  #7  
Old 03-09-03, 11:42 AM
NutAndBoltKing
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Doug has covered all the bases, and with his great advice you should be ready to start your project.

I'd just like to add that the shots (the charge or power load) and the pins (fasteners) you'll be using for the tool you're looking to buy usually come packaged three ways; in bubble packs of 10 or 12, larger bubble packs 25 - 50, and boxes 100 - 250. Nearly all the manufacturers include a multi-lingual information sheet with each package that shows; a) saftey steps, and b) a list that matches the pin and shot to the material you're going to fasten to the material you're fastening to.

These shots, or charges, or power loads, are colored coded indicating power levels. Gray is the lowest and then brown then green, and yellow is the highest. Color blindness is addressed by a number system. Gray are #1, brown #2, green #3, and yellow #4.

For example; a new package of 2 1/2" imported pins I just opened has a sheet in English, Spanish, French, and what I think is Chinese showing safety and that fastening a 2X4 into concrete will need a green colored or #3 charge, into block will need green #3 shot, and into steel would require a yellow one, #4.

Like Doug said, it's important to know what material you're shooting into. Concrete can spall and it's good to test it first. Take one of the pins you're going to use, hold it to the concrete, and strike the pin with a hammer and see how the concrete responds. It may be very brittle and spall or crack apart, or it may be very hard. No one can really tell just by looking; you got to give it a test. You can use a center punch instead of a pin.

If you're going to use a trial and error method to see what shot holds best always start with the lowes - the gray #1 and work up.

When you start the project keep family, children and pets away; and let your neighbors know you're shooting pins, so they don't call the cops and report gunshots. It happens.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: