Stainless wedge bolts

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-03-03, 12:28 PM
Lucky13
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Stainless wedge bolts

I'm considering using four (4) 1/2' x 2 1/14" stainless steel wedge bolts to secure a 6' diving board base to the concrete. I live in the Dallas ,TX area. Does anyone know of a local source where I could buy just four (4) of these? There are fastener companies that will sell a carton at a time but I don't need quite that many. Any internet sources?

Thanks

John
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-03-03, 05:20 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,952
Cool

Have you tried any of the local swimming pool companies in Dallas?
 
  #3  
Old 07-05-03, 12:32 PM
Lucky13
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Nope, but I will.

Thanks

John
 
  #4  
Old 07-20-03, 07:31 AM
Portable Welder
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The proper term is called a masonary wedge anchor Im sure if you open up your local phone book and look under fasteners and you will find several places in just a couple of calls.
 
  #5  
Old 07-20-03, 09:43 AM
NutAndBoltKing
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
PW's right about the terminology and how to find a source - also check www.thebluebook.com, just enter fasteners and your location into their search.

I think I can shed some light on your difficulty finding a dealer willing to sell you a small amount of bolts and only offering box quanities. It really has nothing to do with inventory control or preferances for regular customers. It's all about a few things unheard of years ago. The first is tracking - what lot was sold to what contractor and when. Structural failures do occur; perhaps caused by the fastener itself, or by improper installation, or by misuse. Knowing what lot was used, or not used, is important in the investigation process and determining fault and liability. Another issue is quality control. Two bolts can look-a-like; same diameter, same length, same thread, but one can be 50,000 test and the other 25,000 or one can be 8 grade, the other 5. Breaking open boxes allows for dangerous co-mingling. Also, the fastener market is being inundated with imports that barely - just barely meet strict standards. A 50,000 test US made bolt will exceed that standard, but an import - maybe. Breaking open a box of bolts totaly disrupts accurate quality control. In my view, IMHO, one of the key reasons against breaking open a box for a DIYer is the worry that the bolts will not be used in the format that they were intended for. Example: Quite a few DIYers attempt projects that require long 3/8 bolts but they come into my shop and ask for short 5/16 bolts ONLY because they already have a 5/16 masonary bit. There can be quite a difference in the strengths of closely sized bolts - and "good enough" or "close enough" doesn't cut it. Bolts are not like t-shirts, one size does not fit all and some fastener shops like mine are very reluctant to sell just a handful to a DIYer for fear of misuse.

It's rough sometimes to need a just a couple of this or that but only get offered boxes of 50 - but there are good reasons.
 
  #6  
Old 07-20-03, 08:51 PM
bungalow jeff
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Home Depot and the Sears Hardware sell anchors of all sizes by the bag.
 
  #7  
Old 07-21-03, 05:59 AM
NutAndBoltKing
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Some popular DIY home projects have connections sensitive to stress and strain, and tension and compression (like a diving board, swing sets, garage door tracks, and so on), and those connections should never be made with fasteners of unknown properties.

The average DIYer project seldom needs specialized, high quality fasteners available only from dealers; and the type sold in bins or in bags by big chain stores are usually adequate for the tasks; but sensitive connections such as those described above should only be made with fasteners provided by the manufacturer or with fasteners that come with data sheets or packaging labels describing the properties of the fastener - it's base material, coatings, hardness, grade, tensile strength, yield strength, pull out strength and so on. It's been my experience that the big chain stores buy cheap products (imported low quality) and then do not provide adequate product information on their store bins. All I see is size, price, and a bar code on their bins - what about grade, srengths, coatings? This information IS important but it is seldom - if ever - shown, and the sales staff goes blank when you ask about it.

My advice for anyone needing fasteners for a sensitive connection of any kind is to steer clear of the big chain stores, and to only buy and use fasteners that have the properties shown. When you're out shopping for a fastener for a sensitive connection and you don't know what the fastener in those bins are made from, or what it's coated with, and don't know it's grade, put it down - don't buy it and don't use it.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'