Installing shelves to hollow walls

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  #1  
Old 07-04-00, 12:57 PM
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I need to install shelves, but the walls keep crumbling around the screws and anchors. What do I do next?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-04-00, 01:41 PM
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What type of wall are you trying to install these whelves in -- Drywall or plaster? Has it ever been water damaged? And how heavy are the shelves? Best bet would be to locate the studs and attach the shelving to them.
 
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Old 07-23-00, 10:53 PM
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JaCordova2
What type of anchor are you using? It sounds like you might be using the little tapered plastic type... and they usually useless. Get some of the type that expand behind the wall. I use a type called a Toggler that slips through a 3/8" hole and expands by pushing a little plastic pin through the screw hole in the anchor. There are also metal types that expand when you screw them in. If you have some of the wall conditions posted above, address them before bothering to try the expanding anchors.
 
  #4  
Old 02-13-05, 02:15 PM
spazz
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Same Problem, but...

Hi there,

I have a similar problem...

I am trying to install a bracketless shelf in what was once a closet.

I have only 1 metal stud available to me and based on the shelf plate that will go against the wall, I will only be able to insert 2 screws into that stud. The rest of the screws (and I have about 12 more screws I can insert into this plate) will go through drywall and nothing more.

The drywall is in perfect condition, there is no problem there.

My concern is how to install this, knowing the above info, so that this shelf can hold about 40-50lbs of weight without falling.

Not sure if this is possible or not, but if it is I would appreciate any help or suggestions anyone can offer

Anthony
 
  #5  
Old 02-14-05, 12:01 AM
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Hi Spazz,
- for your problem at least, I have the answer. I often install shelves in walls where you only have drywall to enter. Use the large size Ezee Anchors, white plastic, with a very large coarse thread, driven in by a Phillips bit. They're available in any good hardware store and definitely in HD. Put a #8 1 1/4 screw into them with a drill driver.

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
  #6  
Old 02-14-05, 04:33 AM
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Originally Posted by nomind
Hi Spazz,
- for your problem at least, I have the answer. I often install shelves in walls where you only have drywall to enter. Use the large size Ezee Anchors, white plastic, with a very large coarse thread, driven in by a Phillips bit. They're available in any good hardware store and definitely in HD. Put a #8 1 1/4 screw into them with a drill driver.

Do it Right - Do it once.

I use these often
They work well
I do have a tip, the instructions say do not drill a pilot hole
I have found I damage the drywall less if I drill a small one
'Course I'm always using the big ones and the blade part you hammer in is quite wide
 
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Old 02-14-05, 09:33 AM
spazz
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Thumbs up Thank You!

Thanks to both answers,

That is exactly what I did... I found those EZ anchors that you mentioned at HD and they had a nice little display that showed exactly how they work... It may have been overkill, but I bought the 90lb ones just to be sure and sure enough it looks like it is very solid!

Anthony
 
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Old 02-14-05, 12:35 PM
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There's nothing wrong with overkill ! -I build everything like it's going to hold a ton and last forever !

Do it Right - Do it once.
 
  #9  
Old 02-15-05, 12:23 AM
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Originally Posted by slickshift
I use these often
They work well
I do have a tip, the instructions say do not drill a pilot hole
I have found I damage the drywall less if I drill a small one
'Course I'm always using the big ones and the blade part you hammer in is quite wide

I didn't know there were instructions. What I do is push/twist a hole through with a sort of gimlet tool which also rasps the hole larger further along its shaft. I make a hole nearly as wide as the anchor body (minus threads), and start twisting the anchor in. Then just when the anchor feels like it's about to snap from excess torque it will be slightly recessed. Years later I can skim over the retired anchor with spackle rather than pulling it and leaving a big hole.

These plastic anchors can be clipped short, say if you hit masonry and still want to use the anchor. With lineman's pliers about one in six will just explode though.
 
  #10  
Old 02-15-05, 06:34 AM
spazz
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Metal Ones

Interesting... the ones I found are made of metal and they have these teeth at the end that easily dig in to the drywall, my guess to simulate the creation of a pilot hole, and then from there the actual anchore has a philips head to it that you use to screw it in.

Actuallu once you get to a certain point and the whole has be created very neatly, it slides right in to the point where the threaded part really digs in and at the end you have a very nice insertion.

Then the screw itself goes inside this anchore through the philips head part.

These are actually very cool, never using them before I was totally amazed by them!

a.
 
  #11  
Old 07-03-05, 12:11 PM
stuartlwilliams
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How about plaster wall?

I'm looking to mount a 66bottle wine rack in an alcove onto a plaster wall. The total weight will be 116kilos bottles and rack included. My plan is to put in a shelf that holds 15k, and reinforce it with 4 metal brackets. Might make it 6. The brackets will hold, however, I'm not at all confident about the screws holding this weight. How much does a plug take? Or is this just impossible and I need to distribute the weight to the floor somehow?
 
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Old 07-09-05, 04:53 PM
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How much does a plug take?

If the weight is *hanging* off it, tight against the wall, about 30kg no problem and I'd risk my neck on three in the right conditions. But, twisting, that is - levering out, far less. You know levers. So it depends on where the object's center of gravity is in relation to the anchor. Better anchor high; "hang" the rack. Maybe even use chains.

A winerack that size; there must be a few studs behind it. Isn't there some kind of back to screw through, into studs?

If it was designed to sit on the floor, you may need to add some bracing at the sides (make triangles) to prevent a drooping front.
 
  #13  
Old 07-10-05, 02:13 AM
stuartlwilliams
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Wine Rack

The wall is brick, with plaster, not plasterboard. So yeah, if I get a deep enough screw, it will hit brick.

So if I use the shelf as planned, but also put some wire cables from the wall down to the shelf, which is kind of hanging it, that should do? Hanging from studs in the ceiling is completely impractical in this case.

Thanks,

Stuart
 
  #14  
Old 07-10-05, 02:48 AM
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The only reason to use chains would be to support the front edge without brackets. If the rack is sturdy enough in itself (i.e. it's a sort of frame or box) then neither is necessary. If it's just individual shelf boards then chain (front and even back) can keep everything in place, and, by setting the anchor point fairly high above the top shelf (shelf depth x2), it's not trying to lever itself off the wall like brackets do.

Maybe run a 2x3 hanger over all? That could stay put with some type of (heavy) masonry anchors in the brick.

If you have a *wine rack* then easier: put it on the floor.
 
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