Attaching Fence Post

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  #1  
Old 10-07-03, 07:23 AM
lanem
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Attaching Fence Post

Hi --

I need to attach a wooden 4x4 as a fence post to the top of a poured concrete wall. What kind of fastener can I use to very securely connect this post to the concrete? I have looked at the post fasteners desiged for decks, but these all say not to use with fence posts. I have also tried expansion shields, but these were not sturdy enough. Thanks in advance.
 
  #2  
Old 10-12-03, 10:41 PM
NutAndBoltKing
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Smile

My only suggestion is to have ornamental wrought iron brackets fabricated.

Your situation reminds me of an incident a few years back when the city built a wooden privacy fence atop the wall surrounding the municipal pool. In their first effort they drilled 1" holes in the concrete wall and inserted rebar. They drilled holes into the base of each wooden fence post and fitted them over the rebar. They were happy until Hurricane Floyd hit and destroyed the fence. The city engineer came to me looking for steel support angles, or diagonal braces that would bolt to the fence post and also to the top of the wall. Rather than fabricate the ugly braces that he sketched out I talked him into some attractive ornamental, but very sturdy wrought iron brackets with scrolls and fish cutouts. They bolted into the sides of the wooden fence post and into the wall. The brackets for the end posts bolted into the top of the wall and the brackets for the center posts bolted into the side of the wall. The city was happy and the fence still stands. It withstood a blizzard or two, a couple of NorEasters and Hurricane Isabel.

I don't know if you have adequate space atop your wall to install any diagonal steel or iron bracing, and you may not like the look it offers - but it's just a suggestion.

If you're interested in exploring this option a welding shop or a handrail shop can fabricate them - steel, iron and aluminum are probably your choices, and the cost would probably be T&M, or time and materials.

Good luck!
 
  #3  
Old 10-13-03, 06:53 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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Another thought: While driving in this morning I stopped for coffee near the town's bocceball courts and noticed that they erected a roof over the picnic table areas in the park, and that the roof is supported by 6 wood posts. Half these posts, one side of the structure, rest on a knee high old concrete wall. To fasten them to this wall they had supports fabricated from square tube steel. The tube steel was welded to square plates made from flat stock, which bolts to the wall, and the wood posts simply fit into the tube stock. This type of system may also work for you.
 
  #4  
Old 10-13-03, 08:01 AM
lanem
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Thanks for your reply --

I am actually replacing a 110 yr old wrought iron fence that was destroyed by Isabel (and associated falling trees). Unfortunatly I do not have the $ to fund a similar fence right now, so iron is out of the question. The fence stands only 4 ft tall on top of a very low concrete wall and I have attached the posts as follows. I notched the bottom of the post - installed two 3/8 in conrete wedge bolts in the concrete (sideways) and then bolted the notched 4x4 to the wedgebolts. This seems sturdy, but I am going to give it a few days to settle/loosen before I am sure it will work.
 
 

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