50 pound shelf

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-27-04, 09:09 PM
tomsun2003
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
50 pound shelf

what do i need to do to hang a 50 pound shelf on to my wall without studs? is this even possible? thanks for any help.
 
  #2  
Old 12-28-04, 03:50 AM
nomind's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: langley, in sunny fraser valley, bc , near vancouver
Posts: 1,132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Tomsun,
- almost anything is 'possible' , we just need to know a little more. -What is the wall material, wood, gyproc , concrete or other.
Are you REALLY sure there's no studs ?
post back with more info --there's always a way.
 
  #3  
Old 12-28-04, 09:28 AM
tomsun2003
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
the wall is gyproc, there are studs, i was thinking of nailing some plywood against the wall and then nailing the cabinet shelf into the plywood. would this make it more secure? i need to make sure this cabinet can hold maximum 60 pounds. the cabinet is supposed to look like it's floating.
 
  #4  
Old 12-29-04, 02:12 AM
nomind's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: langley, in sunny fraser valley, bc , near vancouver
Posts: 1,132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Tomsun,
-I must be missing the point here ? -If there are studs, why not make use of them ? You could hold 300 pounds and STILL make it look floating with the right screws into studs. Get a studfinder, mark stud edges on the wall, now carefully transfer the same measurements to the cabinet. Try to cover the max. amount of studs compared to length of cabinet. (make a guidance mark on wall AND cabinet so you can be sure screws enter the middle of studs) Now drill pilot holes in the cabinet. Use at least 12 , 2 1/2 " #10 coarse thread screws ( preferably Robertson head. ) Now use a powerful electric drill to drive them into the studs.

BTW, nailing plywood to gyproc is NOT a good idea. Unless you hit the studs, you will only loosen the gyproc. - In general, forget nails, think SCREWS for security.
 
  #5  
Old 02-13-05, 03:09 PM
spazz
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Please continue...

Hi there,

I actually have the same problem, but in my case I only have 1 metal stud.

Basically, I am trying to put up a bracketless shelf in what was once a closet. The closet is 56" wide and within the space that the shelf will span, I only have 2 stud I can use. This stud is a metal stud.

So, my question is what is the best way to go? Obviously I will use the 1 stud but for only 2 screws, one on top of the other, I have space within my metal frame to insert about another 12 screws, but they would all be in drywall, nothing else behind that, just drywall.

So to continue the original question of this thread, would it be possible to secure this shelf with the above information so that it can stay strong and support about 40lbs of weight, maybe a little more?

And if so, what should I do? Are there strong enough screws or ways to i nsert screws that will hold 40lbs?

Any help is appreciated!

Anthony
 
  #6  
Old 02-15-05, 01:00 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,210
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I guess this "bracketless" shelf is essentially a thick shelf that clips onto a plate already secured to the wall. You said it will span the closet - so I assume this means it will touch three walls. If the "bracketless" shelf is a frame with a top but no bottom then putting screws through the sides - especially near the front corners - will help immensely even if those screws just go into drywall anchors.

The anchors I prefer are shaped like fat screws themselves, usually plastic. They hold in the drywall because they have huge threads. You twist them in tight and then twist the regular screw through your hardware or whatever, and into them.

You can use these anchors also along the back instead of a stud, and they're as good for many purposes, for example in this case, when you're able to support the sides near the front of the shelf.

I'm typing at a computer desk which is basically a large corner shelf. It's mainly anchored to the drywall, not the studs, and it supports a 19" monitor and I can lean on it too...

***

Nomind: "preferably Robertson head", which to those who don't know, is in the form of a maple leaf.
 
  #7  
Old 02-15-05, 07:31 AM
spazz
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Smile Thank You!

Wow! That sounds strong...

I did exactly what you suggested.. I actually I found these anchors by a company called EZ designed especially for hallow walls and that hold up to 90lbs each.

They are made of metal not plastic and they screw in the wall and then this piece of metal (the anchore) flips open on the inside, then as you continue to screw in the screw, the anchor gets closer and closer to the wall until it anchors in the wall creating a very strong hold!

a.

PS. Doesn't everyone know that a Robertson is in the shape of a Maple Leaf??
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: