Screws more brittle than nails?

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Old 02-28-05, 03:04 PM
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Screws more brittle than nails?

I posted on the framing board that I wanted to use screws instead of nails for fastening a 2 X 4 stud that I am replacing due to water damage. One reply I got was that screws are more brittle than nails, so use a 16d to toe nail the studs to the sill and header. Is this true, that a nail would be a better choice here? This is for an interior bathroom wall and the drywall is out but I will put new greenboard back up after the city inspection.
 
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Old 02-28-05, 03:13 PM
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I honestly cannot tell you if a screw is more brittle than a nail. BUT, is there going to be pressure and movement against this stud? If not, who cares which is more brittle. Looks like we are talking shear pressure here. Nails ARE softer than screws. I just don't see why there would be a difference as far as what you are doing with them. Sorry I missed the thread where you were told this. Good luck.
 
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Old 03-01-05, 06:43 AM
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The two most important words in the original post are "city inspection" because code determines the fastener of use.

Don't believe the hype or old wives tales about screws -vs - nails. In this era of high tech state of art fasteners it's IMPOSSIBLE and fool hardy to generalize.
 
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Old 03-01-05, 11:54 PM
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If water damage was in tub/shower area, install concrete underlayment board. Green board is water resistant, not waterproof. You want to avoid having to do the repair again.
 
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Old 03-02-05, 07:22 AM
Aarno
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Quote: "I wanted to use screws instead of nails for fastening a 2 X 4 stud..."

I'm assuming you're talking about ordinary drywall screws. If so, as already mentioned - yes, they are more brittle than nails. However and for what it's worth, there are times when I use drywall screws instead of nails. For example; in tight quarters where there's not much room to swing a hammer (and I'm too lazy to set up my pneumatic nailer), and also when I don't want to be pounding with a hammer for fear of loosening up nearby plaster or running the risk of other damage.

However, when running screws I almost always pre-drill first. One reason (of course) is to prevent splitting - and the other is to make sure that the joined stock is 'drawn' together. Drywall screws usually have threads nearly all the way to the head. If the pieces to be joined aren't tight to start, the threads will hold them slightly apart. Not all that important in some instances, but it is in others.

Also as suggested, keep water and moisture away. If not, it's only a matter of time until you'll be repeating the repair.

Aarno
 
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Old 03-02-05, 05:56 PM
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Construction screws

I bought "exterior screws." The box says they are for general exterior construction and can be used with pressure treated lumber, which I plan to use. They are not drywall screws. I definitely plan to do as much as possible to prevent the moisture to return, like plastic liner, wonderboard, and so on, after the water damaged studs are replaced and the tile put on the shower stall.

I am concerned that the Uniform Building Code, which my city follows, may say something about the use of screws. I do not want to use nails due to how much more difficult they are to remove if the inspector says something or I change my mind. Is there some reason to avoid screws to toe "nail" the pressure treated studs to the sill and header?
 
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Old 03-23-05, 03:31 PM
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use nails

I am not a pro, but can tell you from experience that inspectors will definitely look not only at nails, but the nail pattern - toe nailed, certain number each side, etc. Got to follow the code. And even more important - the inspector. On one of my early projects, when I had something according to code (happened to be collar ties), and with plans approved by my town, the on site inspector wanted something different. Guess what - he wins!
 
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Old 02-23-09, 05:28 PM
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screws vs. nails

I'm a life scout building garden boxes outdoors for my eagle project. I was wondering whether I should use nails or screws for the project? I want it to last, but I'm not sure of the difference. I will be using treated wood, and all I know is to use galvanized.
 
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Old 02-23-09, 05:46 PM
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Deck (coated or galvanized) screws take a bit longer to install, but will normally hold joints a bit tighter for this kind of project. Also, in my experience, easier to keep parts in position when driving. Pre-drill any parts smaller than 2" across. Remember, screws should bite into the part underneath and pull the pieces together. Use square or star drive screws.
 
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Old 02-23-09, 05:53 PM
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And while you're at it, look for the torx headed screws, using the smallest shank you can, probably #6 or #8, in a length two and 1/2 times the width of the board you are attaching. So if you are attaching a 3/4" board into the end of another one, use a screw about 2" long. And as GG said, predrill and countersink your holes. The torx headed deck screws are coated to resist the elements, and are super easy to drive. They include a bit with the box of screws. Good luck with the project, and post some pictures when you are through.
 
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