Mounting on fiberboard (?)

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  #1  
Old 04-04-05, 05:12 AM
JeanM
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Mounting on fiberboard (?)

Hi, all,

I bought an old farmhouse last summer. The 1850 portion of the house has what I think is called "fiberboard" on the walls (I'm guessing plaster & lathe might still be underneath, but who knows?). Anyhow, this stuff is thin, much too thin to hold up pictures that weigh much of anything.

Lord only knows what is behind those walls for "studs" -- I just had the bathroom remodeled. When it was gutted, it was fascinating to see that instead of studs like we're used to today, they had broad planks that had the shape of the tree they came from.

Can I use some sort of wall anchor on those walls, or is there not enough substance to even work with them?

What about those adhesive wall hangers -- how reliably to they hold, say, glass-covered framed pictures? Or would I have to be worried about coming home someday to find my expensive framing jobs shattered on the floor?

I have an antique mirror I'd like to mount over the bureau -- it probably weighs at least 20 lbs. Any ideas?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-04-05, 05:56 AM
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Location: Cape Cod
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The 3M "Command" adhesive hanger work well
I have them all over my 1800's house
But I can't get them to stay on the plastered parts
A large amout of the plaster still on walls here is textured also
And they do not stick to the flat or textured plaster for long at all

I have found studs (it's tricky, even with a good studfinder) and installed shelves and mounted hooks and whatnot, and I've figured out how not to crack the plaster (small pilot hole will do it for me here), and have had no problems

I'm not sure what the fiberboard is
Wood Paneling?
 
  #3  
Old 04-04-05, 06:07 AM
JeanM
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I'm not sure it's called 'fiberboard.' Taken down, it looks like it's made of cellulose fibers pressed together. It can be broken up by hand -- not substantial stuff at all.

I'm "lucky" (?) that any plaster is covered by this board-stuff, even the ceilings. I'm guessing that this was a quick and easy solution to deteriorating plaster.
 
  #4  
Old 04-04-05, 06:16 AM
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Cheaper, quicker, easier, than tearing down plaster and putting up drywall I'm sure!
It sounds like paneling

Is it painted?
 
  #5  
Old 04-04-05, 07:15 AM
OudeVanDagen
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Sounds like the old fiberboard panels popular after WW2, used to cover holes, cracks, and other imperfections. Came in 4X8s, 2X4s and other sizes; sometimes w/T&G edging, sometimes metal channelings were offerd for inbetween the panels, they were easily painted or wallpapered, helped insulate to some degree, and were very very fast and cheap. The downsides are that they did not hold up to dryness or humidity, and over time they often just flake apart, can easily be damaged, and like most building products of that era contain large quanities of asbestos, so these panels are best covered up and disturbed as little as possible. They're very thin and have no structural qualities, are usually easily compressed - and alone, just will not accept nails and screws. Toggles or mollies may help if you find that your studs are not where you wish they were.
 
  #6  
Old 05-09-05, 06:01 AM
JeanM
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Thanks!

The timing sounds about right -- a lot of remodeling was done to the 1850 portion of the house in the early '50s. (The bathroom I just had remodeled dated from then -- ever heard of aluminum wall tiles?!)

Yikes, it never occurred to me that that fiberboard stuff might be asbestos-laden! Thanks for the tip.
 
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