metal studs and cabinets

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  #1  
Old 01-14-06, 12:20 PM
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Arrow metal studs and cabinets

We wish to hang cabinets in the laundry room which has metal studs. The weight of the cabinets when full will be substantial. Can this be done safely? If so what is the best way. Thank you
 

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Old 01-14-06, 05:09 PM
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By "substantial", would you feel safe if these were just screwed to wooden studs? If so, then you probably would not have a problem in attaching them to metal studs. You may have to install cabinet screws with larger heads, and two per stud location. Remember, most of your weight will be vertical, unless you unwieldingly load the heaviest items on the top nearest the doors. Then your weight balance transfers to rotational rather than vertical.
 
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Old 01-15-06, 05:49 PM
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I use self tapping screws from the hardware store when I need to attach something to metal studs
Usually it's shelving or cabinets for commercial customers, and it has to be pretty secure
Other than the self tappers I do it just like they were wood studs
 
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Old 02-15-06, 09:41 AM
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Larry, why cabinet screws with larger heads? im going to be doing the same thing shortly in our kitchen and was just curious what the head size of the screw had to do with the studs being metal?
 
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Old 03-01-06, 04:54 PM
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Lightbulb Cabinet screws

The fastening strip on some cabinets is particle board, which strips out easily.
Most cabinet manufacturers furnish washer-head screws. These would not work in metal studs. I would use a washer under the self tapping screw head for extra support.
 
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Old 03-02-06, 05:04 AM
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They don't have anything to do with the studs being metal, I was just emphasizing the fact of the cabinet backing's inherent lack of pull-through strength. The cabinet screws I use will penetrate metal studs, even though they don't have a self tapping feature. The point is rather sharp and tends to penetrate just fine. Using a washer behind self tappers is fine also.
 
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Old 03-02-06, 05:52 PM
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Larry, what kind of screws do you use? and where do you get them? i went to home depot and they recommended fine thread drywall screws which ive seen mentioned quite a few times on the net but the guys at the depot werent speaking from experience. im thinking the fine thread will be fine for my bathroom wall cabinets but im not so sure about the kitchen ones, im not too enthused about having all our dishes come crashing down one day.
 
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Old 03-02-06, 07:36 PM
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I was sure I got them from HD. They are about 3" long with a #2 square drive head, and the head is about 7/16 in diameter so pull through will be minimized or eliminated. I agree with you on not using the sheetrock screws in the kitchen. They have a tapered head, and the ones I use are almost like a pan head screw. Now, you may have to look for them in the pull out drawers that house the specialty screws. I am sure they weren't with the regular screws. Post back and let us know how it goes.
 
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Old 03-03-06, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by dbdraggin
... i went to home depot and they recommended fine thread drywall screws ...

< grumbles >
Drywall screws are spec'd for drywall
Not a heck of a lot of shear strength is req'd
I would not use drywall screws for shelving, cabinets, framing, pretty much anything other than drywall
Those screws snap like a wooden matchstick under real stress

Yes, it might work just fine, it may hold up for years, you may never have a problem
But cabinets are a lot heavier, stick out farther, use less fasteners per square foot, and then are loaded up with heavy dishes
There are not many poorer choices for fastening a cabinet to a wall then drywall screws

I usually use an all-purpose Robertson Drive screw (square drive)
I never measured the head, so I'm not sure if they are the same ones Larry uses
I've never tried them for metal studs though
On iffy fastening strips I will washer them
 
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Old 03-03-06, 08:15 AM
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thanks guys,

i wish i had seen this post last night before i went to work, already went to the depot this AM so i guess ill be running back tonight to get the proper stuff.

another question, is there any speciafic reason to use such long screws? the back of the cabinets are 3/4" the drywall is 1/2" so wouldnt 2" screws suffice then?

thanks as usual.
 
  #11  
Old 03-03-06, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by dbdraggin
...wouldnt 2" screws suffice then?
Mmmmm....not really...
Figure in some un-even walls, warped studs, a few layers of paint, and some shims to level the cabs, and then you've got a bit more than 1-1/4" to even touch the stud
Figure a 2" screw could give you as little as 1/2" of threads in the stud
I generally use 2.5s
 
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Old 03-05-06, 05:25 AM
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Backing

Commercial carpenters here will put either 3/4" ply or a strip of 20ga sheetmetal on the studs where the cabinets will be before drywall.

The plywood is notched with a shallow saw cut on both ends so the rolled part of the stud fits in there.

Deck screws with a finishing washer work good to hang cabinets.
 
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