Stripped hole in drywall

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  #1  
Old 05-02-06, 07:44 AM
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Stripped hole in drywall

So I'm replacing a socket panel that the previous tenant had screwed right into the drywall. The hole is pretty stripped, though, so the screw can just slide in and out without much resistance, and it's not doing a very good job of holding the panel close to the wall.

Any ideas?
 
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Old 05-02-06, 01:06 PM
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Welcome to the forums

What is a socket panel?
If it is only secured to the drywall you will need to either repair/replace the drywall or use a fastner that will get its grip over a larger area - maybe a toggle bolt.

Drywall is really just a covering and really shouldn't be used to secure something to it - better to use the studs behind the rock.
 
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Old 05-02-06, 02:34 PM
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Sorry, when I said "socket panel" I was referring to those rectangular plastic panels covering light switches, electric sockets, cable jacks, etc. I don't know what they're actually called

And yeah, that's what I figured. I wish they did that the first time, but I've inhereted some dug-out and hole-y drywall.

When you say repair the drywall, are you talking about something you can do easily to the hole? Like a filler or something?
 
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Old 05-02-06, 02:41 PM
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Unless I'm mistaken switch and outlet covers are always screwwed into the electrical device which is screwwed to the elec box which is fastened to a stud with nails or screws.

I don't know if it would be strong enough for your needs but drywall can be repaired with joint compound or durabond [which dries harder]
 
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Old 05-02-06, 02:43 PM
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"Unless I'm mistaken switch and outlet covers are always screwwed into the electrical device which is screwed to the elec box which is fastened to a stud with nails or screws."

Yeah, in a perfect world. These babies were just screwed into the drywall with wood screws.

Thanks for the help! Those toggle bolts look really interesting.
 
  #6  
Old 05-02-06, 04:45 PM
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cr4a - I'm getting a scary picture of a metal drywall toggle being screwed into an electrical box or at best being used to support an electrical device.
Before you go making sparks, it might be a good idea to get some help because it doesn't sound like you are too familiar with wiring.
 
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Old 05-02-06, 05:57 PM
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If it is an electrical box and "screwed" into the dry wall. I would suggest replacing the box with an "old work" type box. These boxes have ears that expand out and against the back side of the drywall when the box is tightened into place.

Before you attempt this conversion, remember that electricity can kill you and make absolutely certain that the power to the box is off before you attempt any improvement.
 
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Old 05-02-06, 07:26 PM
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[QUOTE=cr4a These babies were just screwed into the drywall with wood screws.[/QUOTE]



Is there no electrical box? A box to hold the wiring and device is not a luxury but a NECCESSITY!!!! All electrical devices should be housed and secured to a metal or plastic box.
 
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Old 05-03-06, 07:44 AM
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Oh, no, no, I should have been more specific.

The individual cover I'm talking about is for cable TV, and just consists of a plastic plate with female connectors on both sides. The only thing actually in the wall is a coax cable.
 
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Old 05-03-06, 08:56 AM
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OK a little bit of j/c should take care of it. If you expect the cover/plate to come off every so often you should install an 'old work' box. The plastic ones are only a little over $1 and easy to install.

Glad we are not dealing with an electrical nightmare.
 
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Old 07-06-09, 07:28 PM
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Late to the thread but I knew when I first started reading this was the result of yet another idiot cable installer. They knock a hole in the wall with a hammer and try to fasten a plate to the wall with screws in sheet rock. They ought to be ... {end rant}. Buy either a standard old work box or a low voltage old work box and install. Then using 6-32 machine screws fasten the plate to the box.
 
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