Hydraulic/Pneumatic Cylinders

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Old 01-17-07, 08:55 AM
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Hydraulic/Pneumatic Cylinders

I'm looking for a hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder that, when fully extended, will retract by itself due to suction/vaccuum. I'm also curious as to the name of this type of cylinder. Ideally, I'd like to find one with an adjustable resistance.
 
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Old 01-17-07, 05:37 PM
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You might be looking for something like a closer for a storm door.
 
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Old 01-17-07, 07:19 PM
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Yes, but on a grander scale. It needs to be able to withstand fluctuating forces of up to 1000 lbs. while maintaining a constant velocity. Any ideas? Did I post this in the right forum?
 
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Old 01-17-07, 09:02 PM
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Why didn't you say this in the first place!

Tell us the whole story. We are not mind readers.
 
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Old 01-17-07, 10:00 PM
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Sorry, Greg. I don't much about hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders. I suppose it would be a "single acting" cylinder, but one that returns back to its starting position by itself. I'm also talking about the cylinders that don't need to be attached to hoses or other machinery. I have picture of what I'm talking about, but I guess we can't post pics on this site?
 
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Old 01-18-07, 04:21 AM
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For the time being we cannot post images.
Even if we could the images need to be hosted somewhere else and then linked to have them appear.
You can still post the images to a site like Photobucket which is a free service and then provide a link to the pic.
 
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Old 01-18-07, 06:13 AM
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OK, my interest is piqued. I have got to see a picture of a cylinder that will withstand 1000 lbs. of pressure, return on it's own without the assist of an external force. I think what you are looking for is a spring operated dampening piston cylinder. It will be, like Greg said, an oversized storm door opener. The spring will do the work, but the piston will dampen the movement. I'll wait on the pix. Be sure to stipulate your intended use for this item, as it will help for us to suggest other methods that may work just as well.
 
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Old 01-18-07, 03:39 PM
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I'm also talking about the cylinders that don't need to be attached to hoses or other machinery
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I'm curious about this part. It must be a magic cylinder as well. I know of no hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders that will operate without something being attached to it.

BTW; a single acting cylinder means the cylinder is pressurized to move in only one direction. The reverse action is often caused by gravity. (think a snow plow on the front of a pick-up truck. They do not generally have power down, only up)
 
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Old 01-18-07, 09:46 PM
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And a single acting cylinder will require a reservoir to hold the fluid, whereas a dual cylinder (one with down pressure) will just transfer the fluid to each other. Like you said, nap, I gotta see this one.
 
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Old 01-19-07, 08:22 PM
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Hyd or pnue cyl

One thing I learned many years ago when going into unfamiliar territory is to say what you are trying to do, this helps others help you. What you are describing sounds kinda far fetched. Tom
 
 

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