Cutting Brass Door plate

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  #1  
Old 02-21-07, 07:00 PM
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Cutting Brass Door plate

Help. I bought a 30" wide brass door plate and new to cut it down by 2" or so in length. What's the best thing to use to make a nice straight even cut, obviously keeping safety in mind?

Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-21-07, 08:24 PM
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The problem with cutting the brass (if it's a thin shiny plate) is that you can bend up the edge which will look really bad. I'd suggest you try taking it to a plumber's shop and see if they can cut it for you on their sheet metal shear.

If I had to do it, I'd screw it to a solid piece of wood so that it doesn't move (through the scrap side of the plate) then would try clamping a straight edge onto it and would score it 5-10 times with a carbide laminate cutting knife until it weakens enough to score and snap.

I've cut some thick door plates on a table saw with a carbide blade, but I hesitate to recommend that to others- especially not knowing the thickness of the piece you are working on. Thicker would be better- thinner might irrepairably bend if it caught a tooth just right.
 
  #3  
Old 02-22-07, 07:55 AM
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Yeah. I was wondering if I could cut in on my table saw. It looks like between 1/32" and a 1/16" thick.

Anyone else have other suggestions?
 
  #4  
Old 02-22-07, 10:21 AM
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Cutting Plate

Try a jig saw with a very fine metal cutting blade. Tape the plate so it does not get scratched by the sole plate of the jig saw. Good luck.
 
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Old 02-28-07, 07:02 PM
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Smile Feedback for all advice given

Dear all,
I wasn't comfortable with the jig saw idea, I didn't have a plumbing shop nearby, and I don't own a carbide laminate cutting knife. Sooo... I bit the bullet, used the mounting holes provided on the brass plate and screwed the plate to a 3/4" scrap pine board that was wider but a bit shorter than the plate (making sure the whole thing was squared up, of course). I sent this through my table saw slowly but steadily, using a thin kerf carbide rip blade. The blade performed flawlessly. I cut each end by simply moving the plate so that it was fully supported by the scrap piece. When finished, I took a metal file and gently but firmly filed the burr off that was created on both sides by the saw. The finished product was perfect. The company (National) had even mounted a clear plastic protective cover on one side, which I used as my top up side on the table saw. By the way, don't bother calling them- they couldn't give me good advice on cutting their own plate! The whole thing took me less than 15 minutes. Boy, was I thrilled.
 
  #6  
Old 02-28-07, 07:53 PM
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Nice job. Good thinking by putting the backing on there as you cut! Glad it worked out.
 
  #7  
Old 03-06-07, 04:18 PM
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And I was going to suggest a plasma cutter....Oh well, glad it worked out well.
 
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