What bit is slightly bigger than 5/8?

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  #1  
Old 06-21-08, 05:01 PM
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What bit is slightly bigger than 5/8?

I've set some 5/8'th size bolts into some cement to anchor my shed to, and rather than using a 5/8th bit to drill the holes on my bottom plates and trying to bore them a bit bigger, is there a drill bit that would just be BARELY slightly bigger than that that I could use to drill the holes?
 
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Old 06-21-08, 06:06 PM
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If you break it down to 16th's, 5/8ths is 10/16ths. So the next size larger would be 11/16th's. If you want to stay in 1/8ths, than obviously it's 6/8ths or 3/4".
 
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Old 06-21-08, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by warmsmeallup View Post
If you break it down to 16th's, 5/8ths is 10/16ths. So the next size larger would be 11/16th's. If you want to stay in 1/8ths, than obviously it's 6/8ths or 3/4".
Awesome. Thanks, I can do the math, just wasn't sure what sizes they actually make. So 11/16 would probably be perfect, if they make them. I guess I'll have to check next time I'm at HD.
 
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Old 06-21-08, 06:13 PM
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.... or a 21/32, not as easy to find as an 11/16

There's probably a metric size too but I fried way too many brain cells when I was younger

Just reread your post and realized it is for the sole plate - use 3/4", it will give you a little wiggle room.
 
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Old 06-21-08, 06:47 PM
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As Mark said use a 3/4" drill and then put a washer on the stud.

Jeremy
 
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Old 06-21-08, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
.... or a 21/32, not as easy to find as an 11/16

There's probably a metric size too but I fried way too many brain cells when I was younger

Just reread your post and realized it is for the sole plate - use 3/4", it will give you a little wiggle room.
Ah yes, good point. I want a little wiggle room anyway. 3/4 inch will work great. Thanks.
 
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Old 06-22-08, 01:33 PM
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In metric, the next biggest would be 16mm: 5/8 = .625", 16mm = .629".
 
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Old 06-22-08, 03:04 PM
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You might ask the/a bolt manu for a size recommendation; there might be several, each with upsides and downsides.

It's amazing how products are misused.
 
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Old 06-22-08, 03:12 PM
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paqman,
I thought your shed was sitting on a wooden base? You have a slab? Or are these just footings that you are anchoring the floor/base to?
Just checking into your progress buddy.
Vic
 
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Old 06-22-08, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
paqman,
I thought your shed was sitting on a wooden base? You have a slab? Or are these just footings that you are anchoring the floor/base to?
Just checking into your progress buddy.
Vic
Thanks for checking up on me man. Yeah, it's a slab. I just poured it yesterday, and set in some 5/8" bolts. So really I could just drill 5/8" holes, and maybe bore them a bit bigger, but I would like to just drill a hole just a tiny bit bigger. Yeah, I will be drilling the hole in my bottom plate (the treated 2X4).
 
  #11  
Old 06-23-08, 05:54 AM
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Got it now.

Like was said, drill 'em 3/4". You'll have some wiggle room and once the nuts and washers are on, it won't be going anywhere.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 08:54 AM
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Here's a good chart for everyone:

http://bobmay.astronomy.net/misc/drillchart.htm
 
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Old 06-23-08, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Got it now.

Like was said, drill 'em 3/4". You'll have some wiggle room and once the nuts and washers are on, it won't be going anywhere.
Sweet, thanks. Hey, I layed my pad on Saturday, when should I remove my forms? I was thinking of doing it today. (monday)
 
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Old 06-23-08, 09:38 AM
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It's set, take 'em off. 4" pad, right? It better be set, or there was something wrong with the mix. Did you cover it with plastic? Keep it misted several times a day? Keep doing it. I don't know what the rule is, but I'm pretty sure it gives you a stronger slab if you keep doing it for a few days. Prob not that imperative for a shed floor.

Heck, when I did mine, I took 'em off the next day.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
It's set, take 'em off. 4" pad, right? It better be set, or there was something wrong with the mix. Did you cover it with plastic? Keep it misted several times a day? Keep doing it. I don't know what the rule is, but I'm pretty sure it gives you a stronger slab if you keep doing it for a few days. Prob not that imperative for a shed floor.

Heck, when I did mine, I took 'em off the next day.
Well, it was planned as a 4" pad, but i got more gravel than I needed so it's probably closer to 3 inches. So I just took the forms off. It's set ok, and yes, I've tried to keep it wet every now and then, but it evaporates in less than a half hour. It's freaking hot here right now. I didn't have plastic to put over it, so I've been doing my best to keep it wet.

But now here's my question. After taking the forms off, I notice that you can see the gravel at the bottom, just kind of sitting there loose, like you could dig it out with your hands. That can't be very stable around the edges like that. I'm assuming I just pack some dirt back in where the forms were, and that will keep it all in? Here are some pics I just took of the whole thing. Sorry, I just realized they're really dark in the shade where the rocks are. Lighting didn't come out right. But the gravel is pretty much just sitting there waiting to fall out. Never done this before!


 
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Old 06-23-08, 01:55 PM
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Paq yer doin fine. Looks pretty good to me.
I know the concrete guys will kill me, but I'd say don't worry too much about it. Yer not driving cars on it right? You put wire in it right? That will help ( Concrete pro's...I know, I know, it just keeps pieces together after it cracks). Keep wettin it, I still think it helps. 106 here today btw, I know how ya feel.

Background...
Way back when I was a young guy full of energy, wanted my shed done now! Picked the spot, roughly leveled it, built the forms out of 2x6, threw in about 2" of gravel and called a few places to get pricing. This was on a Saturday afternoon. Only place open was a "mix on site" truck for little jobs. They said they could be there in an hour. Happy energetic me.
Poured the slab (varied from about 4" to almost 6", I said it was rough!), driver and neighbor helped me work and finish it. My very first concrete work! Wow was I happy. Neighbor asked me about my permit...
OOPS!

Went to permit office on Monday..lucky me, I was too close to both the back and side property lines.

Well, this could drag on, but basically, a backhoe operator from construction next door tried to move it. He said he would break it if he really levered it up. Couple of weeks later, I had a flash and figured it couldn't hurt to try. So 5 buddies and I would up using 7' lengths of steel angle iron fence poles as levers and round pieces of firewood as rollers. We worked like Egyption slaves lifting and rolling the 10 x 10 slab to its new position. We levered and shoveled and filled under the slab til it was level. Some gravel came out from onder the edges, but I packed "crusher run/driveway mix" under it and tamped it in. When the flower beds went in and were mulched you didn't even see it. 16 yrs later it was still in one piece.

Basically, if I could do all that and not damage it, I don't think you need to worry. Heck, sidewalks are only 3" all the time. No sledge hammering around the thin spots, no hammer drilling on the edge.

Git 'er done!
 
  #17  
Old 06-23-08, 02:12 PM
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Funny, that sounds exactly like me. I took a little time to level, but not much. I kind of used the gravel for that. And I picked the cement up at a carry crete place. Towed it, dumped it, and took the trailer back. I'm hoping that I can just fill in and pack soil around the edges and that will keep it all together. Thanks for the info.
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 06-23-08 at 02:32 PM. Reason: Not necessary to quote entire post.
  #18  
Old 06-23-08, 06:37 PM
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I think dirt will be ok but if you feel the need, you could mix up some mortar and trowel it on the edges.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I think dirt will be ok but if you feel the need, you could mix up some mortar and trowel it on the edges.
That's a great idea. I may consider doing that before I pack in the dirt.
 
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