Mounting a TV to metal studs

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Old 12-12-12, 08:28 AM
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Mounting a TV to metal studs

I'm trying to get some advice on mounting my new TV. The TV itself weighs about 60 pounds, the mount I have weighs about 30 (and its a swivel mount). My apartment has metal studs. Last time I mounted a TV it was only about 45 pounds of weight. I used toggle bolts (Togglers) to metal studs and it worked fine, never had an issue. However, with this being twice the weight (and also a swivel mount) I wanted to get some advice. I'm able to get 4 toggle bolts in (two on each stud), and I could always throw some more through the drywall (if that even makes a difference, I really don't know how much that would help).

I know there are ways to put 2x4s and whatnot against the wall, and though I've read a lot of descriptions of the process I'm not really sure of the methodology of it, or the practicality of doing it in an apartment vs a home.
 
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Old 12-12-12, 08:38 AM
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I'd be worried that toggle bolts big enough for what you want would require such a large hole in the metal studs that the studs themselves would be compromised. I would think that tight thread, self-tapping sheet metal screws would be better than toggle bolts since they'll anchor right into the studs themselves and won't have to make an appreciably large hole to do so.

It actually is possible to use the drywall for anchoring, but how good that works will depend in large part on how well the drywall was attached to the studs. Essentially you're using the drywall to spread the load out to multiple fasteners holding the drywall up, and if there aren't enough fasteners securing that drywall to the studs then the drywall might fail at its own fasteners. Assuming the wall is built strongly enough, there are special large thread fasteners available at hardware stores meant for anchoring fairly heavy loads to drywall, you might want to look into them. They tap into the wall, and then screws are anchored into the hole in the center.
 
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Old 12-12-12, 10:49 PM
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Have you actually cut away the wall to see how thick the metal studs are. If you can bend the back of the "U" channels in with your thumb and forefinger then I would consider an alternative. Also how thick is the drywall?

You might consider (if you can cut into the walls in this apartment) 2 sheets of 5/8 plywood that are 4' x 16"(some metal studs are installed closer then 16" off center. adjust the plywood size as needed). Check to make sure there are no water lines or conduit behind the wall. After you are sure it is safe to cut into the wall, cut a 4" horizontal hole from stud to stud about 4' off the floor. Now take a 1/2" drill bit and drill into the center of the plywood. In that center hole tie a rope and make sure there is a strong knot on the back side of the board. now, insert the board into the hole in the wall. Once the board is in the wall pull the rope to center it back near the top, then drill 1.5" drywall screws in where you think all four coner should be. Drive 4 more in the outer centers and come in about one foot and repeat the 8 screws. Do the same for the next sheet of plywood in the next stud over. Now, Because the plywood has more surface area then the studs you should be able to safely install your large toggle bolts and hold the 90+ lbs load.

I know it sound like a lot of work, but peace of mind sometime takes sweat.
 

Last edited by EnclosedVisions; 12-12-12 at 11:56 PM.
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Old 12-12-12, 11:25 PM
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When I've run across this problem and I can't open the wall I'll take a 3/4" piece of hardwood (18"w x20"h) and screw it into two of the steel studs. Then I mount the bracket to the wood. The wood can be painted or stained and it'll blend right in.

The last one I did I used TeeNuts in the back of the wood and ran machine screws thru the wood into the nuts.
 
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