Attaching plastic roller catch *without* using metal screws.

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Old 03-27-13, 09:32 AM
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Attaching plastic roller catch *without* using metal screws.

I'm working on retro-fitting a cabinet to store chemicals, some of which emit fumes that are highly corrosive to metal surfaces (pic was taken about six months after installation). I've replaced all metal hardware in the unit, but I need a stop for the doors. I've got some plastic roller catches, but need to fasten them to plyboard with something that isn't a screw made of metal. I saw some plastic-looking screws and snaps, but is there something anybody can recommend?

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 03-27-13, 10:08 AM
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I can't think of any plastic fasteners that would stand up to repeated closing and opening. Have you considered self-closing hinges or an outside mounted latch?
 
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Old 03-27-13, 10:13 AM
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How about stainless steel? Would a stainless screw survive the environment?
 
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Old 03-27-13, 10:21 AM
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The screen door catch is a great idea! It'll be up to the client's aesthetic preferences, of course (whether they want something like that visible on the piece), but I think it would get the job done.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 10:27 AM
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Stainless steel wouldn't work, unfortunately; I had a couple stainless steel screws in the cabinet originally. They didn't corrode as quickly as the other exposed metal, but they did nonetheless.

My other idea was to attach an astragal to the door using glue and maybe biscuits, but the door and astragal can only be 3/4" thick, so that might get dicey.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 04:06 PM
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Aren't the chemicals in a container with a tight lid

I wouldn't think enough fumes would get past the lid to cause any damage. If they are in open containers - they need to change their storage practices.
 
 

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