How much weight can a steel stud handle?

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Old 09-15-14, 04:10 PM
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How much weight can a steel stud handle?

Trying to build a aquarium stand in a indoor/outdoor enviroment ( bottom might get wet once in a while).

Anyways I built my outdoor kitchen area using metal studs from lowes and its held up over a year rock solid with heavy granite on top. Its holding only about 500 pounds or so.

This stand will be 100" long holding about 3000lbs.

I plan on doing a box design with a supporting square every 10" ( might be overkill but it'll give me peace of mind). Here are the specs for the metal studs

Actual Width (Inches) 3.625
Rust Resistant Yes
Actual Length (Inches) 120.0
Hemmed No
Coating Type G forty
Tensile Strength 33Ksi
Actual Weight (lbs.) 3.29
Material Metal
Load Bearing No
Recommended Fastener Screws

stand will be 48" tall. So any suggestions? Would it be able to handle the weight?
 
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Old 09-15-14, 05:09 PM
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Key words in description "load bearing NO". Why not use pressure treated dimension lumber?
 
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Old 09-15-14, 05:45 PM
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8' to 10' long and you want to park your suv on top, hmmm? 3,000 pounds is way beyond something held together with sheet metal screws. When if fails it will be quick and 300 plus gallons of water will do a lot of damage. Without running the math, I would probably opt for a frame welded together.

Bud
 
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Old 09-15-14, 06:07 PM
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Whatever you come up with don't forget that you not only need to support a lot of weight. You must also provide torsional stiffness. While those metal studs might, and I repeat "might", you will need to skin the base with something that can resist twisting and racking. You don't want a bump to cause the thing to fold up like a parallelogram.

For your project I would consider have a steel fabricator or welding shop weld up a simple steel frame. You could clad it with whatever you want to make it pretty and it would keep the base empty to maximize the space for storage or filtration.
 
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Old 09-15-14, 06:45 PM
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For am aquarium that size AND length, you have to be concerned with deflects and not just vertical loads. Most big ones have more problems with leaks (or bonding failures). You need more than 4 corners to have positive UNIFORM support and diagonal braces do not mean much with that length and weight. Wrinkled tin studs may be easy to work with, but you need rigidity and little deflection..

Dick
 
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Old 09-15-14, 07:14 PM
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Oops didn't catch that in the description, the outside grill area is still holding together though using the same structure.

I was going to skin the whole thing in 1/2 hardibacker as well.

I've gotten quotes from a steel shop to do the same build but the prices i've gotten is beyond extreme and the weight of the frame would require a 5 man crew just to put it into place. This thing can be built on site.

Using treated lumber was something that I considered but just thought i'd ask about this first.

The weight of just the water is 1400 pounds. Plus the aquarium 3k pounds might be a little high might be closer to 2k all said and done.
 
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Old 09-15-14, 07:22 PM
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Hardibacker offers no structural integrity. Remember you don't have a car sitting on top of your grill area, as you will with the aquarium.
 
 

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