Repair baby's bed

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  #1  
Old 10-15-14, 04:59 PM
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Repair baby's bed

Hello,

Even though it was made by a woodworker with quality material, my baby's bed sadly got damaged (see attached picture). The side wall was fixed to the front wall with a bolt connected to an insert that was located inside the upper part of the side wall. The insert remained attached to the bolt but the insert was forcefully extracted from its seat. The wood around it is damaged so that I cannot simply put the insert back, the hole is slighly too big.

Any idea how to fix this? I wish not use glue or anything permanent because it is important that the bed can easily be dissassembled for storage afterwards.

Thank you for your attention.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-15-14, 05:10 PM
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If you can extract the bolt completely to free up the insert, use two part epoxy to reinsert the piece into the side wall, keeping the epoxy away from the threads on the inside. Once it is cured, the insert should hold well once you reinsert the bolt.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 06:05 AM
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Hello Chandler,

Thanks for the answer.

However how do I make sure the insert is properly positionned? I must be sure that the insert will be perfectly aligned with the bolt once the epoxy is cured.

Any advice?

Also, can Gorilla glue work too or must I get actual epoxy?
 

Last edited by Needhelp51; 10-18-14 at 06:24 AM.
  #4  
Old 10-18-14, 06:17 AM
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Slightly remove the bolt with the exception of the last few threads, apply the epoxy in the wood hole, then return the fastener and the bolt at the same time. This should ensure good alignment. I would send the bolt further in to clear the threads of the epoxy immediately, then fasten tight after curing.
 
  #5  
Old 10-18-14, 08:32 AM
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I think I have a better idea. Remove the insert and enlarge the hole to the size of a wooden dowel. Glue the dowel in and drill a new hole for the insert after it has dried.

What happened to the woodworker who made it?

I have to say I'm not crazy about the idea of the use of inserts. He really should have used knock down fittings like the ones Ikea would use. I don't think the end grain of the rail is up to the task of resisting the abuse put upon it by babies and toddlers.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 10:38 AM
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Good idea on the dowel, droo. I believe I would still put some epoxy to help hold it. Those fasteners are made to pull in the opposite direction, getting tighter as you drive the bolt, not for end grain use.
 
  #7  
Old 10-22-14, 09:02 PM
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Moved away to another city since then, so the woodworker is too far away to do the repair.

If I understand right:
- I drill a hole much larger than the insert
- I find a wodden dowel that fits in this hole, I suppose it must not protrude from the hole once inserted
- I glue the dowel in, let it dry
- I screw the insert all the way into that dowel
- I align the front wall with the side rail and fasten with the bolt

I understood correctly?
 
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Old 10-23-14, 02:26 AM
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Drill a pilot for the insert to keep wood splitting to a minimum.
 
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