air tank valve operation/inquiry

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  #1  
Old 10-25-14, 04:43 PM
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air tank valve operation/inquiry

I acquired this 7 gal air tank, goes up to 125 max apparently. Never really used these much so don't know quite how to work it right. Looks like the plastic red handle thing that opens/closes the fill thingamajigger has partially cracked off for one thing. Plus, the lens on the gauge I can hardly see through because it's so filmed up on the inside. I did manage to fill the tank at the gas station air station; I can manually turn the end of the threaded fitting back and forth to open and close it with my fingers; the red plastic thing doesn't seem to do anything the way it is when I turn it, probably because it's cracked like that I guess. When I filled it up at the gas station it seemed to take a long time to fill it all the way up the 7 gal point on the gauge; I could see the needle inside through the hazy lens move slowly up to that point. Then I tried using what air was in it to blow out a part at home for maybe 30 seconds. That seemed to use up about half the air just doing that (gauge reads 3 gals left after that). Was wondering can a tank this size/power fill up an average car tire (if the tire was all the way flat)? Any comments appreciated.





 
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Old 10-25-14, 05:01 PM
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That's the relief valve.
It's made to relieve excess pressure to protect the tank from blowing up.
No idea why that red handles there.
Not likely you can fill up any flat tires with that.
Need to go buy a real compressor.
 
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Old 10-25-14, 05:16 PM
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Need to go buy a real compressor.
lol. ^ Not gonna happen, joe, anytime soon anyway.

The tank should at least come in handy for a few things I would think, portable thats kinda nice in a way. So really would like to learn what I can about it. I'll google. Can't be rocket science, thats fer sure.
 
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Old 10-26-14, 04:05 AM
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Without going out to the shop to double check - I think my air tank is the same size and it will air up a flat tire BUT you aren't likely to get enough pressure out of a gas station air pump. I think I put about 100 psi in my tank and while it may not bring a tire up full, it will put in enough air to drive it to where you can finish airing it up.

I can't imagine owning an air tank like that without having an air compressor. It doesn't take long to drain one down!
 
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Old 10-26-14, 04:38 AM
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I use an old modified SCUBA tank and keep it filled from my compressor to air up tires on my tractor, ZTR, etc as necessary. It does a good job on small tires, and will fill a car/truck tire sufficiently for me to drive it down to the shop (1/4 mile away) for a good filling from the compressor.
 
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Old 10-26-14, 08:35 AM
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In regard to how that air valve (actually called a manifold) is supposed to work, I came across a pretty good explanation in a customer review of this one, which is similar: Forney 75550 Tank Manifold for Portable Air Tanks, 1/2-Inch Male NPT Inlet, 1/4-Inch Female NPT Outlet - Air Compressor Accessories - Amazon.com
In the review, the guy (W. Bush) says:
"If you're not familiar with this part, it's tough to tell from the pics what's going on. The schrader valve is directly opposite the 1/4" port for the hose and forms the bottom surface of that port. By using the red "on"/"off" dial to turn the schrader valve you can screw the valve down or out to either close or open the hose port. The red dial does not affect the operation of the schrader valve...the valve is used to plug or unplug the hose port from the air manifold. Clever."

Plus noticed that if I wanted to upgrade/restore my old tank business by changing out my old manifold with a shiny new one (like that linked above without a cracked plastic knob) and even a new replacement gauge with a clear lens, I could do so for a grand total of $20.59 ($14.47 for the manifold plus $6.12 for a gauge),

In response to comments here:

I can't imagine owning an air tank like that without having an air compressor. It doesn't take long to drain one down!
Yes for sure, having an adequate sized air compressor handy to fill these type portable tanks would make the most sense, instead of having to rely on using a gas station pump, especially if used with much frequency. Otherwise, since it drains down so relatively quickly, I can see that such a tank might not be much good for a heckuva lot more than quoted comments below:
It does a good job on small tires, and will fill a car/truck tire sufficiently for me to drive it down to the shop (1/4 mile away) for a good filling from the compressor.
it will put in enough air to drive it to where you can finish airing it up.
I need to go buy a real compressor.
 
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Old 10-26-14, 09:39 AM
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I need to go buy a real compressor
Well said if money is tight [ain't it always ] you might check pawn shops and local want ads.
 
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Old 10-26-14, 09:55 AM
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if money is tight [ain't it always] you might check pawn shops and local want ads.
Good suggestion. Will do. Or garage sale, etc. Even a "fixer-upper" for a reasonable price could be worth considering. Always wanted a dang air compressor. Santa never brings it though.

thanks you guys for the info/advice.
 
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