I need a very large pry bar but where can I buy it?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-02-15, 09:10 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: US
Posts: 42
I need a very large pry bar but where can I buy it?

I just went outside to move two large pieces of granite with my 4' heavy-duty crow-bar but it isn't enough to do the job.

I used to see larger crow bars but I cannot find any company that sells them now. Northern Tool has a sort of pry bar 11,000 lb. they claim but it has wheels on it. I don't want something with wheels. I just need to pry something but it's not something that's flush with the ground - the granite blocks are in the ground next to my driveway and the sidewalk, I will be pouring concrete there to base a post.

I would love a pry or crow bar that weighs like 70 or 150 lbs. Any ideas?

 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-02-15, 09:22 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Cleveland, OH USA
Posts: 521
try a web search for "Pinch Point Bar".

- Peter
 
  #3  
Old 07-02-15, 09:30 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North East Kingdom of Vermont
Posts: 2,348
I have a 10' Pike that was originally used by the Line Crews of an Electric Company to pry out old utility poles. Your local electric company might tell you where you might procure something like that . . . . or check with a Tool Rental Company and see if they can get one to loan out to you.

Mine is about 1╝" hardened octagonal steel with a point at one end and a chisel at the other . . . . weighs about 45-50 pounds. Works good !
 
  #4  
Old 07-02-15, 10:26 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,538
  #5  
Old 07-02-15, 02:18 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
I use what Marksr indicates mostly. I also have the drive shaft to a 1929 Model A Ford that my grandfather formed a shepherd's crook end on. Totally indestructible.
 
  #6  
Old 07-02-15, 05:09 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: US
Posts: 42
If I could find something heavy like the 10' Pike (or heavier), it would be nice. The Lowe's tool does not look like something particularly heavy-duty - it might do as well as my 4' crow-bar but I doubt it would do much better. I want something very, very heavy and pretty thick except at the end. I'm sure they are out there. I have been meaning to go to scrap metal places and junkyards - I may need to really hunt for something. I cannot yet get my winch onto it, and I don't have much to hook my winch up to where I am. I had trees this summer to pull logs up hills but I'm not near enough to them now. I'll just keep searching until I find something. Each day I will just keep trying to dig to the bottom of the stone. It's a huge stone.

I have searched under Pinch Point and pry bar. The Pinch Points are 18lbs., the pry-bars are all monkey-see monkey-do, every company has a little dolly mounted on it. The companies don't want to sell us a 100 lb. bar. I have a custom steel part-maker who makes axles and brackets for me, I may just commission him to design a giant pry bar. I need something huge.

Why don't all the monkey-see, monkey-do companies just sell the bar without the wheels and make it 5x thicker and stronger?
 

Last edited by FencerCurio44; 07-02-15 at 05:33 PM.
  #7  
Old 07-02-15, 06:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,932
This one looks rather heavy duty:
Jackson Pinch Point Crowbar, 26lb, 66" Long JPT1162500

Also Graingers seems to have a bunch and if not there than ThomasNet® - Product Sourcing and Supplier Discovery Platform should have all the rest

If the steel is good then a pipe over the end should give you the length needed.

Bud
 
  #8  
Old 07-03-15, 07:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: US
Posts: 42
I'm looking into your links now. Today I want to dig around the edges and see what I'll need even if I get it rocking since I will need to belt/chain around it and drag/winch it out anyway. It's in a hole and needs to be lifted but this way I can give my back some rest for a day.
 
  #9  
Old 07-03-15, 07:48 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,932
In my mid fifties, about 12 years ago, the things I wanted to do far exceeded what I could to, back included. My solution was an orange Kubota with a loader and backhoe. It's not a big yellow JD, but it has sure extended my ambitions and paid for itself 10X over. Those granite slabs would be a 30 minute job. My love of a small tractor started when I rented one for a weekend. I wanted to tell you the results before I suggested you consider a small tractor rental.

Bud
 
  #10  
Old 07-03-15, 09:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: US
Posts: 42
I went outside and dug around some but it won't budge at all with my 1" diameter crow-bar. The crow-bar just bends under my weight. Yes, a tractor might be able to do it. But it's even hard for me to get access with a tractor due to other stuff nearby. So I've made a decision to use my jack-hammer and break it up into 10 million little pieces. I say 10 million little pieces because my experience with granite is that it doesn't give like concrete does (in big chunks). Granite's hardness is due to 3 minerals primarily: 1) quartz (mhos of 7), 2) feldspar, muscovite or some other weird name, I forget (mhos of 6), and 3) mica (mhos of 2 - 2.5). Now concrete has aggregate that has a hardness of as much as 8, but in-between the aggregate is where the concrete breaks. It turns out that concrete is easier (in my experience) to jack-hammer by a long-shot. So it will be slow-going with the jackhammer - perhaps I can find some mica seams in the granite boulder, and make better progress. I had already gone about 1/2" into the granite with my 1"+ wide bit, but I've yet to try my point-bit on it. My point-bit usually bores really well. I guess I could also try my hammer-drill but in this case, I think I need the hammer. I might try this afternoon or tomorrow. I'm not 100% sure that I can jack-hammer granite but I think a mhos of 7 is doable if I'm patient and use the pointy bit. It's a shame to ruin 1/3 of the granite but at least the other 2/3 will still be in the ground. I only need to get rid of like 1/3 to 1/2 of the granite.

Some granites are softer (down in the mhos 5 or mhos 6 range) but I would guess I've got an ugly harder piece.
 
  #11  
Old 07-03-15, 11:42 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,932
Could you make any progress drilling a line of holes and driving in wedges to split off sections?

Bud
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'