I need a special door hinge

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  #1  
Old 06-05-16, 07:46 AM
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I need a special door hinge

I have a narrow closet next to a shower that's framed for a 16 inch door, with the jamb flush with the wall. I'd like to mount a towel bar behind the door. To do that properly I need a hinge that would kick the hinge edge of the door in a couple inches so the face of the door doesn't hit the bar.

Is there such a hinge?

 
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  #2  
Old 06-06-16, 05:58 AM
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Offset door hinges

Google "offset door hinges" - e.f., Mabis DMI HealthSmart Expandable Door Hinges by MABIS DMI HEALTHCARE | Rehab Store

I'm not sure I understand exactly how these work, but it seems like they might be what you want. I've never used them.
 
  #3  
Old 06-06-16, 06:04 AM
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Offset door hinge

These aren't what you need - I found some images. Name:  offset.jpeg
Views: 123
Size:  6.0 KB

I think you may just have to put a small stub wall and a smaller door if it's important.
 
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Old 06-06-16, 08:53 AM
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I wonder if one of those ball type hinges [or whatever it's called] that mount on the top and bottom of the door would work ??
 
  #5  
Old 06-06-16, 09:29 AM
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A pivot hinge might work, or even the type of pin hinges used on bifold doors (but without the track). But I think either would get in the way of accessing the closet.

What about moving the hinges to the other side? I realize it wouldn't be as convenient for accessing the closet but you should be able to do it in such a way that door would swing open almost flat to the shower so it wouldn't be too bad. Then if you used fairly short towel rods and kept them toward the window the door should clear them...
 
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Old 06-06-16, 07:38 PM
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European cabinet hinges have an extra knuckle that allows the door to swing way out of the opening--without hitting the strike jamb as it opens. This is opposite what I need but it's kinda why I think a complex movement might be out there if I knew what to call it.

Way back in the dusty corners of my mind I seem to recall seeing big doors on a commercial building (bank, museum, etc) where the hinge side of the door dropped back a few inches and then swung open when you tug the handle.

CT might be on the right track to a simple solution, if I understand his pivot suggestion. Move the "hinges" (pivots) 2 inches toward the center of the door and the hinge edge will swing IN and when the door is at 90 degrees it will be 2 inches from the wall.
 
  #7  
Old 06-07-16, 05:33 AM
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Yes, that's the idea of pivot hinges. They are usually used in applications where you want the door to swing either direction. Not the case here, but by moving the pivot point in a couple of inches you will get that much clearance. Just keep in mind that there will need to be enough clearance between the door and the shelves and "stuff" in the closet to allow the door edge to swing in that 2 inches. And the closet opening will effectively be reduced by about 3 inches (the clearance plus half the door thickness. IIWM, I'd move the hinges to the other side and avoid all those issues.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 05:54 AM
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You could put glass doors on the shower that come with a towel bar.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 07:24 PM
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You could put glass doors on the shower that come with a towel bar.
That's sort of a $600 solution to a $10 problem.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 07:43 PM
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Could be, but towel bars are 3 - 4"... so I don't think 2" of clearance or a pivot door hinge is going to be enough to help you much... unless you only want it to open about 70 - 80 degrees before it hits a baseboard mounted door stop.
 
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Old 06-07-16, 08:41 PM
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Would an accordion door be too ugly for you?
 
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Old 06-07-16, 08:57 PM
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http://sugatsune.com/201pdf/550_555.pdf

These would need to be installed on the left side of the door opening. Don't think you will find these for $10. See the accompanying chart for long doors and weight limits.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 04:37 AM
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Should be obvious, but in order to use those hinges, the door would need to be a full overlay door, (like a cabinet door) as in their kitchen illustration.
 
  #14  
Old 06-08-16, 07:06 AM
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Wow--now that IS a special hinge! It's pricey at almost $200/pr (and I'd need at least 3 hinges) but I'd seriously consider it if I hadn't already framed and trimmed for an inset door. There's a 3/4" thick molding trimming out the shower and I think an overlay door would look clumsy covering part of that, and covering the edge/trim of the beadboard on the outside wall.

I might actually install a piece of ply or particleboard on bi-fold door pivots to see if I like it. Might also consider an accordian, or a curtain, or a *very* narrow bi-fold that opens left. A bi-fold gives me more room than a left-swing full door which would have me backed into the toilet to retrieve something from the closet.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 07:49 AM
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Might also want to consider full access bifold doors: Johnson HardwareŽ 1601 'FULL ACCESS' BI-FOLDING DOOR HARDWARE

Once you open them, the stacked door swings out of the way. Obviously would have to go to the left.
 
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Old 06-08-16, 07:58 AM
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If an 8" door leaves you enough room, you could also fit double doors in the opening, using standard hinges and ball catches on top. Would require some carpentry to cut a 16" door in half and mortise hinges.
 
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