Advice on how to deal with a desk mirror's worn threads

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-03-19, 09:13 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 91
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Advice on how to deal with a desk mirror's worn threads

My daughter has a desk mirror she got on a trip to europe a couple years ago.

The screw that held the vertical part is lost and the threads are stripped (and not all that long).

Any advice how to get this back together? I tried a 1/4"? nut I had, but while it goes on a little with pliers, it hits the worn area of the shaft and slips.

I was thinking, but don't know the size or viability of the idea - what about a slightly smaller / next size down from 1/4" nut and just crank it down? I don't have a tap and die set.

I thought about 2 part epoxy in the base, but the threads aren't all that long / not much for the epoxy to grab onto.

THANKS!
 
Attached Images  
  #2  
Old 10-03-19, 10:18 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,457
Received 752 Votes on 691 Posts
Europe uses the metric system. Have you tried metric hardware?
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-19, 10:21 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,933
Received 427 Votes on 398 Posts
1/4" is 6.35mm where closest metric is 6mm but it's the pitch (threads per inch) that will stop it from installing.

If you can confirm the size maybe a die to clean the threads if long enough might work!
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-19, 10:26 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 91
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I meant to point out that I realized that - it's likely metric. but still, the threads are heavily worn. There's not much even a metric screw could grab onto (hence the problem - the original screw worked itself off. I planned on using locktite once i get something.

It looks like an M6 or M5 major diameter is a little under 1/4, so they are likely the correct size. if the threads were in good condition.
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-19, 11:03 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,522
Received 159 Votes on 146 Posts
Have you tried a speed nut?
 
  #6  
Old 10-03-19, 11:30 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 91
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Had to google what that was. No. didn't try that. doesn't seem strong enough to hold the small shaft with the relatively large mirrror above it. but that's why I am here - to get better advice than I would come up with : )

I'll give that a shot. Going to home depot to see about a metric nut.
 
  #7  
Old 10-03-19, 01:39 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,457
Received 752 Votes on 691 Posts
If a 1/4" nut was close to fitting then I'd try an M6 1.0 which is just a bit smaller than a 1/4" and has coarse threads.

If that doesn't work my plan "B" would be to assemble the mirror and put the nut on as best possible and braze or solder the nut in place. Silver solder can be used with a simple propane or mapp gas torch. Of course there is no easy way back from this

For plan "C" I would try epoxy. I don't have great hope of it holding together long term but it could work if the nut is still able to do most of the holding and the epoxy would just help keep things from moving.

Plan "D" would be to cut off the protruding threaded stud flush with the base of the part. Drill and female tap up into the part. Then you could insert a bolt up from the bottom into the part.
 
  #8  
Old 10-03-19, 03:07 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,093
Received 69 Votes on 63 Posts
For something like this, not being sure if it's U.S. or metric, I would grab a pair of calipers and thread gauges to make sure I knew what I was dealing with. If you don't have those you might take it to a local Ace or other large hardware and try some nuts on it. But even then, it looks like it has a fair amount of wear, probably from being loose for some time, so may be hard to distinguish for certain. And to further confuse the issue, depending on its' age and origination, there are a couple of British threads that might be possibilities, and threaded hardware for them is not easy nor inexpensive to come by. Unless it was inherited or there are marks on it that could lead to it having significant value, I would probably go the epoxy route, or maybe JB Weld.
 
  #9  
Old 10-03-19, 05:52 PM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 91
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
THANKS!!! I am waiting for my daughter to call tonight for some other things to ask her how important this is / if she's looking for this to be a decoration or functional.

I went to home depot and the m6x1 nut fits really good, other than the threads are gone. I got that and tried screwing it on, but it doesn't hold everything together - not enough usable threads on the short threaded stub.

I was thinking of trying a #10 nut (why are #12 nuts so hard to find? They exist on paper, but HD has #10 and then 1/4") and trying to crank it down on the shaft. it's a low end mirror bought in a gift shop - more sentimental value than anything else. If even that.

thanks!

Wondering if trying to crank down the #10 on there will snap the threaded part. Or see if I can get a #10 die?

Pilot, I DO like that D option. But I'm not that good at those things / don't have the tools to pull it off.

Not knowing the material, I don't know how it'd stand up to heat? some cheap cast steel type of material?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: