What fastener to go through ceramic tile, drywall, stud?

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Old 03-09-20, 08:48 AM
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What fastener to go through ceramic tile, drywall, stud?

Hi There,

2 related questions.

First question: I would like to mount shelve brackets on my kitchen wall. I will be going through what is most likely a 1/4" ceramic tile, 1/2" drywall, and then a 2 x 4" stud. I'm guessing the length of the fastener should be 2" so that part i have figured out. But the question is what type of fastener do i use? Would wood screws work or do i need something specialized for this job?

Second Question: What fastener if there was no ceramic tile? Just 1/2" drywall and 2 x 4" stud.

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 09:02 AM
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Most any wood screw would be fine, obviously you'd need to use a tile bit to drill the pilot hole thru the ceramic. The tile is probably closer to 1/2" thick.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 09:38 AM
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Like marksr mentioned. It's not really about the screw. You'll have to drill through the tile or a grout line with a carbide or diamond bit and a hammer drill to make a hole for whatever screw you choose. I would add that 2" is the minimum I'd consider for a light duty shelf. For anything more substantial I'd get something longer as you could loose an inch to the sheetrock, thinset and tile leaving only an inch in the wood.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 09:44 AM
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I've never had any issues drilling thru tile with a regular drill. .... I don't own a hammer drill.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 09:54 AM
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Thanks guys.

I guess for choosing the drill and its bit i can go with the cheaper option that is less secure or the more expensive option that is more secure since you guys are not in agreement on the subject matter.

But one thing is clear to me, i will need to go with a minimum of 2 1/2" screw length since the length of the bracket, the tile, and the drywall add up to approximately 1 1/8" minimum. This would leave me with 1 3/8" going through the stud. I'm guessing that should be enough.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 10:31 AM
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I guess for choosing the drill and its bit i can go with the cheaper option that is less secure or the more expensive option that is more secure since you guys are not in agreement on the subject matter.
You have me confused what option is less secure?? As long as the screw is snugly in the stud and has a head big enough to hold the bracket it should be secure.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 11:20 AM
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Sorry for confusing you.

Here is a quote from searching the question "Should i use a hammer drill on ceramic tiles?":
"Never use a hammer drill for ceramic tile. You'll shatter or crack a ceramic tile if you drill using the hammer function. Hammer drills are fine for brick or concrete, but not ceramic tile.

So that means that Pilot Jane's advice is wrong. So i will give credibility to you and take your advice.

So to summarize, i will use a regular drill with tile bits to make the hole through the ceramic tile and then use a wood screw that is 2 1/2" long with a big head.

There is only 2 questions that remains. Should i use a coarse or fine thread screw and should i use a screw plug for the space that goes through the tile and the drywall?
 
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Old 03-09-20, 11:52 AM
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Fine thread is for metal, you want coarse thread for wood. IMO the only reason for a plug would be if you drilled the hole too big. I'd use a drill bit the same size or just slightly larger than screw. You shouldn't need to drill thru the drywall or into the wood.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 11:57 AM
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Excellent. Thank you marksr.
 
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Old 03-09-20, 02:39 PM
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I've never had any issues drilling thru tile with a regular drill. .... I don't own a hammer drill.
I agree, but you do mean to use a carbide or glass drill bit?
 
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Old 03-09-20, 09:31 PM
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Question: Have you located the studs in the wall ?
You'd need to locate them before drilling your holes.
 
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Old 03-10-20, 01:44 AM
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I have not yet located the studs in the wall. I plan on using a stud finder. I'm assuming the stud finder will work.

Note, the installation of the shelve brackets will be done in the near future by a friend who is more adept with this stuff. At the moment i am simply gathering information and providing him with the tools, products, and the instructions as he will do the installation for me. I could entirely rely on him to do it but i feel more comfortable if i have my take on it and he has his take and both our takes are in agreement.
 
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Old 03-10-20, 02:47 AM
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do mean to use a carbide or glass drill bit?
Yes! ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
 
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Old 03-10-20, 04:24 AM
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Locating studs underneath tile can sometimes be difficult. Is the entire wall tiled? If not then your friend can search for the studs elsewhere then measure over to have a reasonable idea where they might be under the tile. 16" is the most common spacing though they are sometimes spaced differently especially where a wall meets another wall.
 
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Old 03-10-20, 05:51 AM
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I don't have any space without tiles on the walls where i want the shelves. I had a feeling there was going to be a problem with finding the studs through the tiles. I also have a feeling that the combined thickness of the bracket, tile, and drywall is too much compared to the maximum thickness that i can safely penetrate through the studs without reaching any wiring.

Here is the thicknesses:
Brackets: 1/8" maybe 3/16" (i haven't purchased them yet)
Tiles: 1/2"
Drywall: 1/2"
Total: ~ 1 3/16"

So if the total is ~ 1 3/16" and i can only penetrate through the 2 x 4" studs (assuming they are not 2 x 6") a maximum of 1 1/4" before reaching possible wiring then that means that there is too much thickness to the bracket, tile, and drywall compared to screw in the wood. For this reason, along with the difficulty in finding the studs through the tiles, i think i am going to have to go with plan B, which is to mount the shelve brackets on another wall that has only drywall. This other wall is less desirable but doesn't have the two aforementioned obstacles that come with the tiled wall.
 
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Old 03-10-20, 09:06 AM
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If the house was built in the past couple decades and subject to building codes you should be safe penetrating 1 1/4" into the studs. If the wiring or piping is any closer to the surface it should be protected by a steel plate. While it's great for protecting the wiring it can really screw you (pun intended) when trying to screw through tile as you won't know the steel plate is back there until after you've put a hole in your tile wall. If you are a gambling person the odds are in your favor against hitting anything.

Another thing you can do to locate the studs is check the back side of the wall (other room) for studs. For example if you check the bedroom wall that's the other side of the bathroom wall. If one end of the wall meets an exterior wall that serves as a good base point since the bedroom and bathroom likely share the same exterior wall. When measuring off the wall make sure you account for any extra wall thickness between the rooms if that wall in the bath is also tiled.
 
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Old 03-10-20, 11:02 AM
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I will take a chance with penetrating the studs to 1 1/4". However the walls to the kitchen are all exterior so locating the studs through another room is not possible.

Ultimately, my decision now is to go with plan B and just hang the bracket shelves on the alternate wall that has no tiles. This is an easier job and still produces satisfactory results.

But thanks for the suggestions nonetheless.
 
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Old 03-28-20, 05:59 AM
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Hi, if there is an electrical outlet near the location remove the cover plate and use an awl or long finish nail to probe the edge of the box for the stud then measure from appropriate stud center to next stud, usually 16 center line.
Geo
 
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Old 03-28-20, 06:21 AM
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Without any tiles why not just use a stud finder?
 
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Old 03-28-20, 10:50 AM
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What if there is No STUD where i would need to hang say a shower rod? Bigger hole in the tile and insert a wall screw anchor?
 
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Old 03-28-20, 11:00 AM
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You could use plastic molly's in the tile. The typical size you would use would be 1/4".

There are other fasteners you could use but they require a larger hole and your shower curtain bracket may not cover them.
 
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