Type of Screw

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Old 05-19-20, 12:16 PM
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Type of Screw

I have a screw and I am not sure what type of screw it is and I want to identify the screw. The screw is used in a metal patio chair and table. I am trying to find an identical type of screw because the patio furniture is missing some of them.

I tried Home Depot and Lowes and they don't have anything close to it. Please refer to the pictures. Hopefully someone can identify the screw and where I can purchase it.

Thanks.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 12:30 PM
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That's quite an odd ball. I would start by measuring the bolt. Get the diameter of the shank/threads and count the number of threads per inch. You can also take a known bolt like a 1/4-20 or 5/16-18 and hold up next to it and see if they match. You can also see if the threads interlock nicely. If they do they are likely the same thread. Be prepared that this may be a metric fastener. Once you know what size bolt and the thread pitch you can measure it's length.

That only leaves finding a head style you want. A standard hex head will be easy to find but can have sorta sharp edges. I've never come across that type head so it might be proprietary/custom made for the chair manufacturer. If you can't find an exact match a button head cap screw would have a nice low profile, smooth head.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 12:34 PM
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That is a rare fastener.

Quick name is cap head bolt but not usually seen with the hex opening.
I agree..... there is a very good chance it's metric.

There are too many different kinds of fasteners for the home improvement stores to carry them.
A local hardware store..... maybe an Ace hardware would be good place to go .
 
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Old 05-19-20, 02:13 PM
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Thanks for the responses. Like most pieces of furniture they give you odd types of screws and related hardware. I did try a hex bolt but didn't like it. It was hard to screw in the hole. Perhaps, I didn't have the right size/thread comparison to the original screw.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 02:19 PM
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Ya, you need to have the same threads. If I'm unsure of the thread and can't take the nut with me, I'll try and find a nut that fits the bolt at the store to make sure I get the right size bolt.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 02:35 PM
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If you know the furniture manufacturer, try contacting them & see if the have a parts department that has some of those.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 02:36 PM
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Socket head bolt. Socket head cap screw.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 04:10 PM
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They will have those or so ething very similar in the drawers of hardware. Take one with you to put a nut on, so that you can identify the thread size and count. Then look in the drawers for the appropriate size machine bolt. Keep in mind they dont need to match exactly. Just the same thread and length.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 04:38 PM
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Most hardware stores will have a bolt size/thread gauge. Both metric and English. If the hex head bolt is too sharp a file can fix that.
 
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Old 05-25-20, 02:36 PM
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Late to the party, but those look like rolled threads to me. Rolled threads are cheaper compared to cut threads.
 
 

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