Need help with casters

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Old 10-02-20, 05:57 AM
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Question Need help with casters

We have a vintage Delta-Rockwell Homecraft Jointer/Table Saw Combo that I need to be able to move around. My dad bought me a "Powertec Dual-Locking Swivel Caster Set", but the threaded stems are a quarter of an inch larger than the holes in the Jointer/Table Saw.

I would like to simply enlarge the holes so the casters can be attached, but I am unsure what type of metal the base is made of, and the holes are close to where the feet curve. Here are some pics for reference, and it is the larger middle hole(s) that need enlarged.






What is the best way to enlarge these holes given their location, and not knowing the type of metal?

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies!
 
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Old 10-02-20, 06:08 AM
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My best guess would be steel legs. Don't appear to be cast iron. Those stems must be huge if they are 1/4" bigger than the holes in the feet, those holes look to be be about 1/4" themselves. Do the casters have locking wheels? Reason I ask is that the saw will tend to wander around when in use if the wheels aren't locked. As far as enlarging the holes, a decent drill bit should be able to drill them out. Not sure how the slight angle at the leg ends is going to affect the geometry of the casters. Can you post a pick of the casters?

BTW, nice setup. My favorite tool is a Delta-Rockwell Homecraft 8" table saw that's about the same vintage, minus the jointer.



 
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Old 10-02-20, 06:42 AM
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I'd use a step drill on this one.
Less likely to catch and hurt your wrist or break the drill bit.
I'd also want them to be two swivel, and two solid, and all 4 to be lockable.
The solid ones I'd mount to the feed side of the table.
If it was mine I'd also go an extra step and make up some square, at least 1/4 thick plates to mount to the bottoms of the feet that could be bolted through those two smaller holes.
That would make it stronger, and give you a flat surface to rest the casters against.
 
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Old 10-02-20, 07:01 AM
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You lucky dog I want it. Do you see me drooling over here.
 
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Old 10-02-20, 10:38 AM
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How tall are your casters? That will raise the height of your saw so make sure you are OK with the taller height.

Stud casters need a good, vertical mounting for the threaded stem. I am thinking you will not be able to get them vertical into your feet and keep them vertical. With the wheel off center the caster will tilt and not be able to swivel. You might be better off screwing your saw to a square of plywood then attach plate mount casters to the bottom of the plywood.
 

Last edited by Pilot Dane; 10-03-20 at 05:55 AM.
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Old 10-02-20, 09:26 PM
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My best guess would be steel legs. Don't appear to be cast iron. Those stems must be huge if they are 1/4" bigger than the holes in the feet, those holes look to be be about 1/4" themselves. Do the casters have locking wheels? Reason I ask is that the saw will tend to wander around when in use if the wheels aren't locked. As far as enlarging the holes, a decent drill bit should be able to drill them out. Not sure how the slight angle at the leg ends is going to affect the geometry of the casters. Can you post a pick of the casters?

BTW, nice setup. My favorite tool is a Delta-Rockwell Homecraft 8" table saw that's about the same vintage, minus the jointer.
Good eye! The holes are 1/4", but the caster stems are easily twice that. And yes, all four casters do lock... here's a pic of the package with info, and one of the casters.


I'd use a step drill on this one.
Less likely to catch and hurt your wrist or break the drill bit.
I'd also want them to be two swivel, and two solid, and all 4 to be lockable.
The solid ones I'd mount to the feed side of the table.
If it was mine I'd also go an extra step and make up some square, at least 1/4 thick plates to mount to the bottoms of the feet that could be bolted through those two smaller holes.
That would make it stronger, and give you a flat surface to rest the casters against.
I have been searching the garage for a step drill because I am sure there is one somewhere, but no luck yet. Also, the casters do all lock, but I wanted all four to swivel just because space is a little tight. I did mention making a bracket of sorts to my dad, but he does not seem interested in the idea. Thought about just doing it myself, but only have wood to work with, and I am unsure if any of it is hard/strong enough.

You lucky dog I want it. Do you see me drooling over here.
Is that how my shoes got wet? LOL Guess I should be happy I did not post pics of all our other 'toys'

How tall are your casters? That will raise the height of your saw so make sure you are OK with the taller height.

Stud casters need a good, vertical mounting for the threaded stem. I am thinking you will not be able to get them vertical into your feet and keep them vertical. With the wheel off center the wheels will **** and not caster. You might be better off screwing your saw to a square of plywood then attach plate mount casters to the bottom of the plywood.
The casters are about 3-1/2" tall, which is why my dad got them for me. After spending hours digging out a couple sets I had in the garage I realized they were 5" tall, and I am only 5'2" LOL

I will keep pushing the idea of making a bracket of sorts because I know without it the casters will end up less vertical and more diagonal
 
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Old 10-03-20, 02:51 AM
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If the resources and will exist, the best option is to go with as large of diameter casters you can get, they will roll much easier and not get hung up on any small imperfections.

For my shop equipment I build frames using urethane casters, they glide smoothly across the floor!





 
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Old 10-03-20, 05:52 AM
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Good advice in post 5 from Pilot Dane. Casters will not track even if any stem is not vertical. You may be able to use beveled washers on the underside of the leg paws( if the underside surface is flat) to create a horizontal surface for mounting the casters as an alternative to Pilot Dane's suggestion.
 
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Old 10-03-20, 01:01 PM
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If the resources and will exist, the best option is to go with as large of diameter casters you can get, they will roll much easier and not get hung up on any small imperfections.

For my shop equipment I build frames using urethane casters, they glide smoothly across the floor!
The casters (pic above) I am trying to add are urethane, but I wanted them as small as possible because I am too short to raise it anymore than necessary.

Good advice in post 5 from Pilot Dane. Casters will not track even if any stem is not vertical. You may be able to use beveled washers on the underside of the leg paws( if the underside surface is flat) to create a horizontal surface for mounting the casters as an alternative to Pilot Dane's suggestion.
I agree! I want to attach a wood board to the feet on the left and another to the feet on the right. But my dad just wants to slap the casters on and call it a day. I think he just does not want to do any more than he has to, but I had planned to do everything myself. I think he does not trust me or something, but I am unsure why because I have done a lot of projects around the house and done them 'right'. I will research something to death and back before I do anything because I am one who would rather have it done right the first time
 
 

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