Cpap


  #1  
Old 02-05-15, 06:00 PM
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Cpap

Anyone here use a CPAP machine? How long did it take for you to get used to it? Do you think it has greatly improved your life, or at least your sleeping? Or do you find it to be of minimal help or even no help.

I'll give more information about my CPAP usage if I get any replies.
 
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Old 02-05-15, 06:31 PM
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Use it... It will improve your snoring and sleep apnea... Or whatever you have... You should wake up not tired after a few weeks... Basically increase your nighttime oxygen levels...

But like anything you have to use it...
 
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Old 02-05-15, 06:33 PM
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Started using one 5+ years ago. Took nearly a year before I adapted. Tried different masks, (nose cover, nose and mouth cover, and finally tried the nasal nozzles), and that was when I became comfortable with it and what I now use. I now depend on using the CPAP for any sleeping.
Using CPAP and other things I dropped 55 pounds first year of use. Was told the same weight loss story by others that used CPAP. Sleep much better and more refreshed when I awake. Even use it at 'nap time'. I'm 70 yrs old so I slip in a nap when I can.
Discovered it worked best sleeping in recliner with the CPAP. I also have bad "itis" in right shoulder, so sleep best in recliner because of itis.
Do it like glasses, just put it on and wear it. I started at two hours and now go as much as 9 hours occasionally. Usually wear it around seven hours each night. I have to arise early because I drive a school bus or I would sleep more.
After 6 months I told sleep Dr. I hated it, but would use it. I now tell her I wouldn't be without it.
Happy adapting!

RR
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-15, 07:13 PM
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As much as I hate mine, it did help a little on the nights I was able to fall asleep and stay in bed. Because of frequent bathroom stops and difficulty just falling asleep I abandoned using it. Basically I was getting less sleep battling the beast than just going downstairs and falling asleep in my recliner. The recliner has been my solution to several problems, but if my o2 level were in trouble I wouldn't hesitate to give it another try.

One more detail since I know your technically gifted. Mine had a ramp up stage that didn't seem to be set right, don't remember the details, but do remember the rude service personal who insisted I repeat several billable trips back to them to try different settings. I asked for the software so I could make my own adjustments and they absolutely refused. When the machine stopped working there was no warranty, just more billable service so it now remains in its pretty little bag and will probably never come out. Newer models out now anyway so I should probably just toss it.

As RR said, the recliner would be much easier as I don't toss and turn as I do in a bed.

Good luck,
Bud
 
  #5  
Old 02-05-15, 11:39 PM
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Here's the back story.

I already bored you with the experience of a week in the hospital over what I thought was a simple kidney stone. Since then I have been to more doctors and have had more tests run than the previous thirty years combined. Most of it stems from the pulmonary doctor being fearful that when coming out of general anesthesia that I would "forget" to breathe and suffer a cardiac arrest or something.

Going back just ten years and most every doctor I have seen has stated that I have obstructive sleep apnea (osa) and that I need a CPAP. This without doing any diagnostic testing and based only on my complaint that I do not feel "refreshed" when I awaken after a normal (for me) sleep and the fact that I am overweight. When I try to explain that I have ALWAYS felt this way, even as a teenager it is lost on them. It is the same when I try to tell them about my swollen nasal passages and my post-nasal drip which at sometimes makes normal breathing difficult. Once I went to a "sleep specialist" and she made me fill out a four-page questionnaire while sitting in the examination cubicle and then proceeded to ask me the very questions that I had already answered in writing. She then stated as fact, again, without any physical examination that I did have osa and I needed to to a sleep study both to confirm and to fit me with a CPAP which "cures" the condition. That really set me off and I told her in no uncertain terms that a CPAP was NOT a cure but a crutch. I practically had to choke her to let me tell her of my nasal problems. She then prescribed some OTC pills and also a nasal spritzer to deal with the nasal problems.

Well, previous doctors had also prescribed spritzers and inhalants and in every case they were either ineffective or the "cure" was far worse than the disease and aas far as I know these "cures" were to be for the rest of eternity. This doctor even went so far as to have the sleep center call me several times to set up my appointment but I just said no way I'm going to listen to someone that calls a CPAP a cure.

Moving back to the present, this pulmonary doctor (Dr. S.) seemed at first interested in my plight and he did admit that the CPAP was not a cure but simply a mechanism that allowed people with osa to lead a more or less normal life. While in the hospital I had been diagnosed as having chronic low blood oxygen saturation levels and I had to agree to having an oxygen concentrator at home that I would use 34/7 before they would release me. It was less than two weeks later that I first met Dr. S. and one of the things he had me do was called a walking stress test where I walked up and down the hall for eight minutes while my blood oxygen saturation was continuously monitored along with my heart rate. I did this with no supplemental oxygen and passed at which point the doctor told me I did not need the oxygen 24/7. At that point I stopped using the portable bottles and mostly just used the home system for when I was sleeping. Subsequently I was issued a "take home sleep study" apparatus and the results of that test did indeed show evidence of osa as well as low blood oxygen saturation levels while sleeping. At that point Dr. S. pretty much insisted that I get the CPAP.

So two weeks ago I picked up the machine at the sleep center and with very little instruction I started using it that night. I was told that I would feel like tearing the mask from my face but to stick to it as it would get better. Well, I've only had one time when I just had to get rid of the silly mask but for the most part I do not see/feel any lasting benefit. Maybe two weeks is just too short a period. I did go back to the sleep center after 5-6 nights of use and Dr. S. stated that my "events" had dropped significantly, from about 50 to 11 based upon the data logger of the machine. The one real problem I told him about was that eventually the pressure would rise to the point of literally blowing so hard the mask would lift from my face with a farting sound so I asked him to lower the maximum pressure a few points but he was reluctant to do so. I go back again on Monday for further evaluation.

So, I have a full-face mask because I told the sales tech that my nasal passages will often swell up to the point that I cannot breathe through my nose and have to breathe through my mouth. I had the straps pulled up tightly to prevent the higher pressure problem but that also was quite uncomfortable. I then read on a sleep apnea forum that a properly fitted mask did not need the straps to be unduly tight as the design of the mask was such as to have the higher pressure make the seal rather than the straps. I tried this a few nights ago and it does work, until the pressure rises over about 16 units at which time the mask lifts and farts and I wake up.

Now at first I did seem to benefit, it was much easier to breathe with the exception of the mask squeezing my upper nose which constricted my nasal passages but moving the mask to a slightly different position would cause it to not seal near my eyes and allow the wind to blow across my eyes and that would keep me awake. Some nights I can have the silly thing on for several hours and not be able to sleep although other times I am able to go to sleep within ten or fifteen minute. Sometimes I awaken feeling fairly well but today was horrible in that all I wanted to do was to go back to sleep and indeed, I did take a nap (with the CPAP) for two-three hours this afternoon, waking with the mask blowing off my face and not feeling a darn bit better. Of course I get the expected anti-benefits of an itchy nose, straps irritating, mask pinching and real fun when a cough come along. One problem I don't seem to have is tossing and turning but because of different issues I cannot sleep on my back. I used to think that if I had to use a CPAP that I would wake up dead with the hose wrapped around my neck but so far that hasn't happened. One time the hose did become disconnected from the mask but maybe that was because it hadn't been fully seated and latched.

I've got 51 total hours on this thing, averaging about 4 hours a session with the apnea incidents averaging about 4 an hour. If I understood correctly my insurance will pay for this thing in three months as long as i meet some "compliance" level of usage. Trouble is, I rarely sleep more than four hours at a shot and I usually do not go back to sleep for another six or more hours of being awake. I sure as heck don't want to have to buy this machine as the cost is over $900.

Well, time to take my shot, wash out my mouth, watch an hour and a half of TV and then take my antibiotic. Yeah, waiting to get rid of this kidney stone has given me TWO urinary tract infections.
 
  #6  
Old 02-05-15, 11:48 PM
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Bud, one of the first things I did after getting the machine was to do an Internet search to find out how to get into the clinical menu. I found a sleep apnea forum that had instructions for many different machines and I downloaded them. With the machine I have the ramp time is adjustable from none to forty-five minutes by the user and I have it set to thirty minutes. I also found that default minimum was too low for me so I had the doctor set it up to start at eight units instead of five.

So far I haven't changed any of the clinical settings but that is mainly because the doctor is still overseeing me on a frequent basis. Once the surgery is complete I will probably not be seeing him as often (if at all) and I will try it with the maximum pressure lowered from twenty to about fifteen.


One more thing, when i was a kid my mother would accuse me of being so lazy that I didn't even want to breathe and she promised to get me an iron lung. She never did but I find that I DO sometimes forget to breathe. This little machine has helped somewhat in that department.
 
  #7  
Old 02-06-15, 06:37 AM
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I've been on CPAP 7-8 years. Lost 50 pounds. Have more energy and endurance during the day. Issues with straps, not pressure settings, so have never messed with the "sacred" setting. I do adjust the amount of moisture but actually I'm not all that sold on the moisture.

Did stop using CPAP at one point - issues with suppliers - frustrating! - and when I went back on it 6 months later could feel its benefits after only 2 nights, so have stayed on it.

Absolutely hated the initial sleep study - head straps way too tight and techs slow to answer call-light for bathroom visits. Incidentally, for my several nightly bathroom calls at home I don't take my mask off - much easier just to disconnect the small tubing from the larger tube and wear the mask. Dangling small tubing must look like a small elephant trunk but it's so simple to reconnect when I'm back to bed. And nobody cares what I look like in the small hours except the dog and she's never complained.

My insurance will no longer cover my preferred mask so I went looking online for CPAP supplies. Filters much cheaper than terrible charges they were submitting! Tubing not bad. So I'll handle those costs myself, at least for a while. Machines still very expensive so I'm glad mine and its accouterments are very durable. The filters that I replace faithfully are now even carried by Amazon.

At first it did take some will power to make myself use CPAP full time. I finally just planned several days without activities so I could have some bad nights if necessary to learn my new habit. And when I bit the bullet it took only a couple nights till the process was endurable. Since then it's just in the background, not keeping me awake.

Besides feeling better, I like knowing that I'm preventing the silent damage to heart, brain, kidneys, etc., that all those hypoxic (low-oxygen) "events" cause.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 11:35 AM
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I've read stories about people that honestly think they would die if they went even one night without their CPAP. They live in fear of power outages or else have battery back-up or a generator for their machines. They absolutely have to take their machine if they go on an overnight trip.

I had two friends that used a CPAP. Bert, who died about two years ago from a progressive lung disease, said that for the first month he was using CPAP it was wonderful and he hadn't felt as good for years. He went on to state that after that initial burst he lost the benefit and things went back they way they were prior to the CPAP. He was, however, in his early seventies at the time.

Dave, who is still very much alive and in his mid fifties, used his CPAP for about a year and he said it did definitely help during that time. He also made some lifestyle changes including diet and regular exercise and like many he lost a significant amount of weight. He stopped using the CPAP but maintained his diet and exercise program and feels great.


Now my experiences the last two nights. I went to bed, fitted the mask (without the hose) and did my bumble-bumble getting all adjusted in bed with the pillows all set to the necessary position and the blankets as well. Then I connected the hose and the machine started. (I found that if I connected the hose and started the machine before getting adjusted in the bed it caused all sorts of problems.) After the initial ramp-up to the 8 cm./H[SUB]2[/SUB]O minimum pressure and minor adjustments to my mask I was breathing easily and soon went to sleep. Only two to three hours later I woke up with the mask blowing off my face and coughing something terrible. Of course I took the mask off and the machine then stopped. I then took a short bathroom break, including clearing my throat of collected mucus and put the mask back on and got into bed. It lasted maybe two hours and then repeated itself. I cannot believe that sleeping for two hours and then waking under these circumstances is good for me.

Something else, when first starting I will clip my pulse oximeter to my finger and then watch it as I am going to sleep. It will start out at around 95, drop to a low of 87 or lower and then immediately rise to the upper 90s. It seems to repeat this cycle fairly consistently, at least as long as I can keep my eyes open to watch the meter. So much for the CPAP keeping my blood oxygen level high. I did better than that when I used a nasal cannula with the oxygen concentrator.

This morning, after the second, or maybe third event of waking with the high pressure I took the silly thing off and then went back to sleep within minutes and stayed asleep for the next three hours. Yesterday morning when I finally got out of bed I was still tired and grumpy but today I feel reasonably well.

I see the pulmonary specialist in the sleep center again on Monday but somehow I doubt that he will agree with me that the maximum pressure needs to be lowered. I'll probably lower it myself and then see what happens, it can't hurt any more than not using the machine at all.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 12:52 PM
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You know that hair that stands up in the back of your neck (still have some there) when you feel something is wrong but can't place the blame, well these cpap machines have been around for a very long time and my gut is saying they (at best) work poorly but they are the only tool available. They have survived the process of becoming an approved device so everyone who gets tested will amazingly need one.

Next doctors visit, pulmonary or primary, suggest that, although not life threatening, there is absolutely no reason to endure the post nasal drainage and same for the nasal swelling. Your nose needs to be part of your breathing at night. I can't say for sure how those issues for myself have gone away, but I breathe through my nose with ease, all night long and no more apnea. At least for myself I suspect an allergy from something I have given up or a bacterial infection in my nasal passages that got wiped out by three straight antibiotic prescriptions for an infected tooth. Lost the first surgeon to a motorcycle accident so they kept repeating the antibiotics until a second one could get on board. After all was done I noticed the post nasal drip was totally gone.

Doctors are of the opinion that apnea isn't something that will go away, but for me, the recliner, major diet change, and subsequent significant weight loss has improved or eliminated many of the same issues you have described. I have had to buy a nuclear powered alarm clock because once I take my hearing aide out and fall asleep, I hibernate, and wake up fully rested.

My rant,
Bud
 
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Old 02-07-15, 05:03 PM
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Bud, I agree for the most part. It has been my experience that doctors are very quick to jump on the sleep apnea bandwagon and especially so when a patient is overweight, which I most certainly am. Obstructive sleep apnea must have been around for millennia yet it has only been in the the last thirty years or so that it has become a cause for so much otherwise unexplainable misery. There ARE some other treatments, depending on the exact cause of the apnea, but the treatment of choice (by doctors) seems to be CPAP. What especially galls me is that doctors often make the diagnosis of sleep apnea without any kind of testing or physical examination.

Along with this is the FACT that many doctors actually call a CPAP machine a "CURE" when in reality it is nothing more than a means of dealing with the symptoms and not the underlying cause of sleep apnea. CPAP does NOTHING toward eliminating the underlying cause of the problem.

I don't like to think this but I have to wonder if doctors receive "kickbacks" from the manufacturers and/or distributors of CPAP machines and their consumables. I would hope not but the potential IS there and it could be a great potential for less than honorable doctors to push the machines rather that look at ways to alleviate the underlying problems.


As for my post nasal drip...it started when I was 26 years old, right after suffering through a bout of strep throat. Since that time I have had many doctors prescribe different nasal sprays, most with corticosteroids, along with antihistamines and even inhalers. NONE have even come close to a cure although the adverse reactions have been many. The strange thing is that my condition seems to wax and wane but with no discernible pattern. Sometime I can go weeks without problems, sometimes it is so thick I have to physically remove it from my throat with a pair of forceps. Sometimes it is extremely sticky but fairly thin so that it completely covers the back of my throat and sometimes it is nothing more than a rope down the middle of my throat. No matter what, no doctor has ever made a dent in it and every new doctor wants to do the exact same thing as previous doctors.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 05:39 PM
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I went for a full monitored night sleep study about 10 yrs back and they said medium level sleep apnea (even though I snored and grunted like a train pulling 300 cars up a hill. I saw part of the video and my wife once recorded me...so I knew it was a fact.) and the ENT doc said CPAP might be an option, but first he put me on Flonase which helped tremendously. I even asked him about the then new laser treatments which basically scar up the soft palate to tighten it up and he said that was a radical step ATT.

I still use the Flonase since apparently I have some allergies to stuff out here in AZ certain times of the year. If I'm feeling particularly congested I use a half dose of the typical cheap WM 12 hr nasal spray before bed and that makes a huge difference as well. Sleeping on my side really helps also. I stuff pillows behind me so rolling on my back is more difficult.

The old guy I had as a roommate last year was diabetic, triple bypass, overweight, etc, and he used a CPAP every night. He said it took about a month to adjust to it. Cure? Of course not. But then, neither is a pacemaker. If you need it, you need it.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 02-08-15 at 12:58 PM.
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Old 02-08-15, 12:42 PM
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I learned some more about this stupid thing in the last 12 hours.

It starts out nice and easy. As it ramps up the pressure it becomes easier to breathe until it goes over a certain threshhold. At first it seems to follow my natural breathing, supplying air as I inhale, stopping when I stop and not interfering with my exhalation. Even after a significant time (30 minutes or more) I am still breathing easy and it follows my breathing rate whether I am breathing fast or slow. Breathing is definitely improved under these conditions.

BUT, and this usually happens after I have fallen asleep, it develops a mind of its own (either programmed this way or else it is defective) and it raises the pressure AND keeps blowing regardless of my breathing rate. This is when it starts farting out the sides of the mask and wakes me up. I stop inhaling but the machine keeps pumping the air at a much higher pressure than necessary. It does eventually stop but it blows far more than my lungs can hold. When it does stop blowing for my exhalation it will start blowing again very quickly as if it wants me to be breathing something like 25-30 or more breaths per minute. I can't keep up with this rate for long and that is another reason why I wake up.

This morning I woke up at least three times with this condition, second time I noticed just under six hours of cycle time so I went back to sleep to try to get it up to a full six hours but when I again woke due to the overpressure/fast rate issue the timer stated a cycle time of about 30 minutes. I knew the date setting was correct but also that the time of day setting was incorrect so I went into the clinical menu and found that the "time" was just a few minutes after midnight. AHA! It now seems as if any time in use between midnight of one day and midnight of the next is cumulative but having the actual time when "midnight for the machine" occurs being around 9 AM sure makes it difficult to accurately keep a record of the actual daily usage.

I need to download the analytical software for this thing as that will allow me to fully read the memory card and print out the full list of clinical results.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 01:03 PM
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Sounds like it's doing the same sort of thing that a bad regulator on scuba gear would do. I got a bad one once in Guam and it just kept putting out air even when I wasn't inhaling. Made it darn hard to exhale too.

Of course, they were mechanical back then, maybe still are. Probably just needed a rebuild or adjustment of some sort.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 01:31 PM
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I wish you better luck with your request for THEIR software than I had. But you seem to have more control already than I had. All I remember was a ramp problem and then one night I woke up as it had simply stopped, no power at all. I was sucking air from somewhere, but sure was unhappy. Of course when I took it in and plugged it in it started up just fine and they looked at me like I was some old foggy. Old, maybe, but that is all they see.

It will be interesting to see if they listen,
Luck
Bud
 
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Old 02-08-15, 02:10 PM
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The software is readily available for download from the sleep apnea forum I mentioned in the first post. I'll send you a link to that forum via PM if you are interested.

The machine I have is a ResMed AirSense10. Only been out a few months as I understand.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 02:20 PM
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At this point I don't need (or want that beast) so thanks anyway. Knock on wood.

BTW, how many of the masks has your insurance company ended up paying for. I have 6 because everyone they open they bill. Not enough space to drift here, but I have two clear examples of fraud. It doesn't reach back to the doctors as I can tell, but the people selling and servicing the equipment were very bold at cranking up the insurance billables.

Bud
 
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Old 02-08-15, 02:31 PM
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Just one mask so far. The sales rep told me that they would contact me in a month as far as replacement of the consumables (mask seals, hoses, filters, etc.) is concerned. (It has only been 15 days since I got it.) She alluded to most of the plans from my insurance carrier pay for the machine after three months of certified minimum usage. I sure hope so as the stupid thing has a retail cost in excess of $900. If I don't use it (they call it compliance) I have to pay for it myself as there are no returns. Racket? Yeah, I think it is. Heck, the mask alone has a price in excess of $100 and it is nothing more than a glorified respirator mask that I can buy for about $20 WITH a set of cartridges. Fact is, I might see about converting an old respirator mask as it might be less uncomfortable.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 03:58 PM
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I think I should get one. Wife is complaining about the snoring and sleep apnea... plus when I wake up I definitely don't feel rested.
 
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Old 02-09-15, 10:19 AM
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Re not needing CPAP any more: if you are able to lose enough weight, you might well test normal (i.e., don't need it).

IMO, some of the weight lost by going on CPAP is because you feel better so don't have to try to regain energy by (over)eating. Just my thought, not official. And alas the weight I lost wasn't enough to get near "ideal" numbers. Guess CPAP isn't Santa Claus.

Sleep apnea is wayyy-y-y more common in overweight people than skinny folks. No wonder we hear more about it, as fat as our country's becoming.

Sometimes I think that the diagnosis of sleep apnea is mostly made by the answers the MD gets from his questions - then while the test does confirm his diagnosis, it's mostly to determine the severity (frequency of "events"), and to test different pressures to find the one most effective for you.

Yes, some suppliers really do make a racket out of supplies - the amounts they'll charge for simple square filters of foam rubber are disgusting, let alone the more sophisticated parts! But off insurance coverage, the suppliers face competition and their prices get a lot more rational.
 
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Old 02-09-15, 10:33 AM
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What gets me is how high the mark up is on some medical devices. A dozen or so yrs ago I was fitted for back brace, I asked how much it was going to cost and was told that there might be a small co pay but the insurance should pay for most, maybe all of it. I wore it for a few months and it was helpful but then I got a bill in the mail stating the insurance wouldn't pay and I needed to remit $1100 - for a back brace!! I offered to return it, no way was I going to pay that much. They said for me to keep it, they would work it out with my insurance. 6 months later they billed me again and again I called them up with them saying they were still working with the insurance company. Long story short, I never had to pay but I never got any paper work saying the insurance paid either. Still don't understand how they could justify that price for a back brace.

I had a neighbor that got one just like mine but medicaid/welfare paid for it. I asked him how he liked it and he said it wasn't comfortable so he threw it in the burn barrel
 
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Old 02-09-15, 11:02 AM
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I have to go to the sleep center and see the doctor in a bit but when I return I will start a new thread on medical costs and insurance. I have a lot of disturbing info on that subject.
 
  #22  
Old 02-09-15, 11:26 AM
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Mark, one of my suspicious encounters was similar to what you describe with them saying the insurance will take care of the bulk of the cost and they will bill me for the rest, this was for an o2 concentrator. I insisted upon knowing my EXACT cost and they hedged saying it depended upon some details as to whether I had reached some level determined by my insurance. I said I understood, but they needed to understand that I wasn't going to sign anything until I had my cost in writing. They called me at home and said their number cruncher had determined it would be $35 a month BUT they could only get the final number from the insurance co the next day. Well the next day came and he pushed 3 forms in front of me to sign and none of them stated my cost. Some tense discussion and an hour later they returned with an email from my insurance provider saying my monthly contribution would be $85 a month. When I said no thanks they were less than happy.

I have tried to watch the billing statements from my insurance co to see if they later billed for the two office sit down conversations, but everything is in code so I have no idea. But that code method will need to change, as I have received bills a year after my appointments and struggled to determine what they were for.

Furd, I look forward to your thread on insurance.

Bud
 
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Old 07-09-15, 09:22 PM
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Cpap

I just signed up after reading your informative CPAP posts. For me it works wonderful. I usually sleep 7-9 uninterrupted hours and have gone from nodding-off several times daily to not being able to take a nap! I guess that's both good and bad. I totally agree with the fact that some folks (like me) adapt fairly easily and really benefit from the machine but the entire industry around CPAP feels slimy. The expense, repeated visits to the Dr. for Rx, etc. I'm on my second machine and use the nasal pillows very effectively. However, every year I'm expected to visit the sleep specialist who will check my bp, ask a few questions and then grant my Rx wish (for the supplies). The Dr. visit was $375 for my last few minute visit. I've done well, I don't need to see the specialist but I have to. At least I thought I had to until I recently learned that most all of the supplies can be purchased online as "replacement parts" without a Rx (purchasing the headgear, straps, pillows, hoses) as a unit require a Rx, Buying the parts individually do not. I am a happy camper now. I only really need to replace the nasal pillows every couple of months and they can be bought for less than $20 each. I hope that this is helpful to anybody who may be in a similar situation. It feels great to feel as if I'm "getting away with something"..no Dr and no Rx. Yay!
 
  #24  
Old 07-09-15, 09:38 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
Hi Zay,
Thanks for the information and it is great it works for you. But as you said, people are different, some do and some don't. Unfortunately, the industry wants as much money as possible from them all.

My update would be, the use of a recliner for sleeping has totally eliminated my apnea. I used to wake up suddenly and learned to recognize that as an extreme apnea episode. Poor sleep and all of the symptoms, plus a disastrous sleep study. I now sleep beautifully and if I didn't have to get up early for my little dachshunds (tiny bladders) I could sleep for 8 to 10 hours straight. Even with 6 hours I can now get up and take care of the puppies and go right back to the same dream.

Snoring is gone as well along with the acid reflux. It was the acid reflux that got me started with the recliner.

Best,
Bud
 
 

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