Desktop air purifiers...any good?

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Old 05-03-20, 06:26 AM
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Desktop air purifiers...any good?

Any advice or suggestion concerning a desktop air purifier?

I do 3D printing using ABS in an enclosed room. Although I don't do continuous printing and I do open the window, weather permitting I can't escape the ABS fumes. Fortunately my printer is enclosed and does a pretty good job of isolating the fumes. But they must go someplace and I assume eventually in the surrounding air.

I have selected a couple possible purifiers for an area of about 100 sq feet. Question is, can these air purifiers handle ABS fumes? One of the units boost..."100% OZONE FREE, we NEVER use UV-C light or anion purification that cause or aggravate health problems." Would an ION booster or UV be of any benefit? These units are
ETL listed, FCC certified, and CARB approved and can tackle particles down to 0.3 microns .

I have another 3D printer on order and I don't believe it comes with an enclosure, but I plane on installing one.

BTW...I need to keep the cost below the $100 level.

Suggestions welcome.

 
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Old 05-03-20, 08:07 AM
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There are two different things to be concerned about. Fumes and gases versus particulate and dust. A filter can filter out particles like dust and soot but most won't remove gasses. For gasses venting your printer to the outside would be best and would also take care of most particulates produced by your printer. A small fan and some flexible ducting connected to your printer's enclosure might be an option.
 
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Old 05-03-20, 08:33 AM
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A small fan and some flexible ducting connected to your printer's enclosure might be an option.
The problem with that is two fold. I have double hung windows and how do I vent through those and still maintain a "winter" seal for heat lose? 2nd is the fact that ABS needs a constant environment with out drafts and a constant temperature surrounding the bed plate.

The window problem I can work around, but the printer venting is a little tougher.
 
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Old 05-03-20, 09:39 AM
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A filter can filter out particles like dust and soot but most won't remove gasses
For gasses or VOC, the only thing that I know that works is activated carbon!
 
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Old 05-03-20, 01:09 PM
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These units do use activated carbon filters
 
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Old 05-03-20, 02:52 PM
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You might try a Pure Air (brand) Blue Pure 411 (model). It's $120 from the mfrg, shipping included. I bought mine in an "open box" special off eBay for $100. It has a 3-stage filter and the outer layer contains activated charcoal. The mfgr recommends changing the charcoal every six months and the replacement is $8. They also claim that on the high fan setting it will filter all of the air in a 161-cu.ft. room every 12 minutes.

For about 15 years I had been having allergies that were if not debilitating at least lifestyle-limiting. I was on all four families of anti-allergy meds and relief was only marginal at best. Much of the time my symptoms were every bit as bad as if I weren't taking any meds at all. A review of the Blue Pure 411 caught my eye and I decided to gamble the $120 against the possibility of some relief. So I bought one and put it in my bedroom.

At first I tried not to make any judgments, just to give it time to settle in before saying yea or nay. But in three months the spring pollen season was starting up and I was still nearly symptom-free, despite having stopped taking both of the oral antihistamines I was on. And I keep waiting for the other shoe to drop but 15 months on the inescapable fact is that I'm darn near cured. Apparently by putting a pretty effective air filter in the room where I consistently spend the most time.

So that's my story with this filter. Whether the charcoal layer will do you any good, I couldn't say. I'm still using the one that came with it new and I haven't noted any fall-off in its performance. So either the activated charcoal is good for longer than the mfgr claims or I'm not sensitive to whatever it is the charcoal is supposed to remove.

Not long after the allergies started trying to ruin my life, I tried a series of room air filters. At the time I ignored mechanical filters because I'd got infected with the "newer=better" disease, and mechanical filters are strictly old-fashioned, so all I was considering were things like UV filters and ozone generators, including the one made by that english fella that talks funny. I got better use out of the box they'd come in than any of the filters.

I reckon that if you live long enough you finally come to understand that newer isn't necessarily better and them old fuddy-duddies were a lot smarter than folks today want to give them credit for.


To me, the ultimate measure of whether something is worth what I'd paid for it is that if evil elves crept in to my house and stole it while I was asleep, would I gladly spend the same money to buy its replacement. If the fan faeries crept in and stole my 411 tonight, tomorrow morning I would buy its replacement without hesitation, even if I had to pay double, and I'd also foot the bill for overnight delivery.
 
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Old 05-03-20, 05:00 PM
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Fred,

The one I'm looking at seems like the same thing. 161 sq ft, 3 stage and so on. $57. Rated as one of the top three for that class.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07DFVYZCR...v_ov_lig_dp_it

I also asked the same question in one of the 3 D print forums. Surprisingly only one response. I think most of those people have already lost all their brain cells. But the person agreed that the charcoal filter is what will filter the ABS fumes or gas burn off.

While I still have few brain cells left I'm going for it. The brand I'm looking at is
LEVOIT HEPA Air Purifier for Home Bedroom, Small Desktop Air Filter for Allergies and Pets,100% Ozone Free Air Cleaner, Smoke Dust Pollen Dander Cooking Odor,LV-H126(Available for California). And it does use charcoal filtering.

But I'm still wondering about the 100% OZONE FREE, we NEVER use UV-C light or anion purification part. The others do use UV and OZONE and tout it as a feature.

Is it good or bad?
 
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Old 05-03-20, 09:06 PM
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Norm..... not sure if you've spend any time on you tube but there is a guy there called big clive. He has many videos and he discusses UV vs ionization (ozone). He is extremely factual, knowledgeable and fascinating. You may enjoy his style and watch a bunch of his videos.

Big Clive
 
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Old 05-04-20, 03:37 AM
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Will do. First day back to work. Will need to wait until tonight. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-04-20, 04:33 AM
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Norm, I agree with other comments on VOC and the use of activated carbon air purifiers. That, of course, doesn't mean any particular air purifier will successfully remove VOCs.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that "volatile" does not equate to dissipate. VOCs can stay on the printer and surrounding objects to be given off over 1+ months. Thus, it is necessary to run the air purifier long after printing. In addition, while opening the window or leaving the room are beneficial, doing those things will not replace an air purifier.

Finaly, carbon filters work by VOCs adhering to the outside of the carbon. As a result, the filter will only work for a relatively short time and need to be cleaned or replaced often.
 
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Old 05-04-20, 04:42 AM
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Norm, I've been thinking further about your printer issue. One additional suggestion, cover your printer when not in use to minimize VOCs given off after printing. You shouldn't have a problem finding a cover for around $35.
 
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Old 05-04-20, 07:43 AM
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If you are concerned about capturing VOC's I would jury rig my own filtration. Since many states allow growing marijuana at home there are some good air filters available online including Amazon. I'd get a 4" charcoal filter (about $45) and blower. These filters contain much more carbon than your usual home air filter and will be able to do a much better job absorbing noxious gasses.

 
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Old 05-04-20, 11:45 AM
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The printer is already in an enclosure. And it does a good job. But during printing it would be nice filter out the little bit of VOC that escape.
 
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