Heat pump compressor replacement


  #1  
Old 10-29-04, 11:39 AM
AmyH2OEng
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Question Heat pump compressor replacement

Hello. This is my first post on this board.

I currently own a townhome, but will be moving out in a couple of months and turning it into a rental unit. However, the heat pump is not working and I need to replace it. I am currently looking trying to decide whether to replace the compresser only, or replace the inside and ouside unit. There is nothing wrong with the inside unit. Also, if I only replace the condensor, are there other things I should be looking at, such as replacing the lines and/or installing a liquid line filter drier.

History of the unit:
The inside unit is a 19 year old Carrier unit. 2.5 ton unit for 1550 sq.ft.
Right after I bought the townhome, 7 years ago, the outside unit failed (the aluminum coil broke). Luckily, I had a home warrentee. They replaced the outside unit with a Goodman, but did not touch the inside unit. The company that did this is no longer in business.

Symptoms:
Right now, the fan works, but since the end of the summer I have not had a significant amount of cooling -- and now heating. Someone came in and said that the heat pump part of the compressor wasn't working and I need to replace the compressor. He said he wasn't able to check the freon charge, since the heat pump did not work - both pressures would be equal.

Options:
Since I am turning this unit into a rental, I am not looking for peak efficiency, I'm looking for cheap practicality.

- Can I replace only the outside unit without sacrificing equipment life? Some salespeople have suggested that the outside unit failed early because newer equipment is not matched correctly with my 19 year old inside unit. Other vendors have refused to quote on only replacing the outside unit.
- If I can replace only the outside unit, are there other factors I should consider? Should I only replace it with a Carrier unit? Or are there others I should consider. Should I replace the lines? Should I have a liquid line filter drier installed? Anything else I'm missing?
- If need to replace both the inside and the outside unit, I'd like something economical, but that will not break down after 5 or 7 years. One salesperson suggested that I should go with Payne, since it is made by Carrier, but much more inexpensive. What is the reliability of a Payne?

Thanks for your help in advance!

Amy

 
  #2  
Old 10-29-04, 12:32 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
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19 years said it ,get a new indoor blower coil unit and the outside unit also .So it is a match. most of the time we say 15 years is tops. You will get a unit with a much higher SEER.

ED
 
  #3  
Old 10-29-04, 12:52 PM
AmyH2OEng
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That is exactly my point. I do not need a much higher SEER efficiency.
Also, there is nothing wrong with my indoor unit. This was confirmed by the heater guy that came out and inspected the unit.

First, my electric bills were not too high to begin with.
Second, I am going to rent the unit out, and the tenant will be paying the bills.

I do not want to pay the higher cost ($1000 +) of replacing the indoor unit for the sole purpose of saving a little bit of money for my tenant. Is that the only primary reason to replace the inside unit?

What are the ramifications of only replacing the outdoor condensor?

Also, you didn't answer my questions of replacing both the indoor and the outdoor units. Is it okay to go with a Payne instead of Carrier? Are there other brands I should consider? Is there a source to go to that lists the reliability/weatherability of different brands?

 

Last edited by AmyH2OEng; 10-29-04 at 02:29 PM.
  #4  
Old 10-30-04, 12:51 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
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You can mix any match units you want . But will they work good and right . Who knows. Then if something goes out they can say its the other parts fault not theirs So you get the bill to fix it.

ED
 
  #5  
Old 10-31-04, 04:55 AM
heatpumpman
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It will be cheaper.... in the long run,

on you to have both pieces replaced. You don't even have to go back with a heat pump. No, you aren't trying to save the tenant any money, the advice given on here is to save you money and time and aggravation. Who can put a price on time and aggravation?

A matching set of equipment, inside and out, comes with a charging chart that is compatible with each other. It eliminates any guessing that always happens with mis-matched equipment and gives you the best odds possible of a trouble free, long living unit.

You don't have to take anyones advice. Go the cheapest route, just replace the compressor. Pour money into that thing over the next several years, listen to the tenants complaints about how it's not working again!, or even risk losing tenants over it not working, and think back 5 years from now and consider what would have been the best choice. Spend some now, rest easy later.
 
 

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