Heat pump - water leaking from it - why?


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Old 12-16-04, 09:37 AM
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Heat pump - water leaking from it - why?

Hi,

We have a heat pump system with emergency gas backup. Two days ago, as temperatures plunged into low 30's, high 20's here in PA, I noticed some water on the floor in the basement that seems to be coming from the heater (heat pump indoor unit). Today, I definitely saw water dripping and leaking out of the unit and saw some water (through the vents) inside the unit. I checked out outside the house where unit exausts the air and saw some water condensate accumulating on the exause pipe and dripping on the ground. I assume that some of it can drip back into the unit. Now that's only my assumption.

Here are some questions that I have:
1) Is this normal?
2) If not, then is this dangerous? Will it eventually break the unit?
3) How can this be fixed? And approx. how much would it cost?
4) What can I do to avoid this if it's not fixable?

I appreciate your advice as I am not a pro in HVAC science.
 
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Old 12-16-04, 12:30 PM
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Is the gas furnace a 90% system and there is water, you got a leak some where.. It has to be found before something gets ruined from the water.

Water from the exhaust pipe (PVC?) is normal due the the lower exahust temp.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 07:51 AM
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Well... HVAC guy came over to take a look at our heat pump leak... He said the heat pump indoor unit is all rusted out inside and the water that is being collected there is possibly leaking through some rust or a whole, instead of being pumped out through the pipe. He said it's so rusty inside that he would be afraid to touch it, fearing it would start falling apart. (Don't forget the system still works fine, just leaking water on the basement floor).

His advice was - let it run and die. When it dies - replace it. The system is 17 y.o. and is nearing it's expected lifespan. Not worth investing any money into. He also suspected a crack in the heat exchanger (we have gas backup).

It all sucks since we bought this house about 6 mos. ago (and it wasn't cheap). Previous owner said she had serviced the system twice a year and had a contract with major local HVAC company. She paid nearly $600 per year for it. House inspected also suspected a crack in heat exchanger. The seller had a professional to inspect AND CERTIFIED the system. We have his certiciate saying the system works fine. Is it worth anything?

My HVAC guys said - it looks like nobody touched the system for 17 years - so much dust and rust was inside. He also said those certificates aren't worth the paper they're written on.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 10:51 AM
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Whatever you do don't run the gas heat untill you confirm whether or not the xchanger is cracked.

Whether or not that certificate is worth anything or get you anywhere is beyond me.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 02:45 PM
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17 yr old 90% unit is past its lifespan. if the collector box (collects condensation for removal) is rusted, you do not have much choice
 
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Old 12-20-04, 04:36 PM
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Thumbs down

With the guy here also dont turn on the gas furnace till you get it looked at. Like to know where the water came from there. When a heat pump goes into defrost its a AC for sure.But I have never seen that much water come off the coil for the short time it runs. In defrost

I checked out outside the house where unit exausts the air and saw some water condensate accumulating on the exause pipe and dripping on the ground. I assume that some of it can drip back into the unit. Now that's only my assumption.
Sounds like it could be from the furnace not the heat pump. If thats 17 years on it all for sure get it out of there.

ED
 
 

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