Space Heater for room in barn


  #1  
Old 08-31-05, 10:59 AM
mrschmitt
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Space Heater for room in barn

I hope that this is the right place for me to be asking this question. If it isn't, I apologize. I am looking for a space heater for a room in my barn. The room is minimally insulated, and has no other heat source. I don't need the room to be warm, just a bit above freezing(mabye 5 -10 degrees celcius). As it stands now, the heater has to be electric since I don't have any other lines going to the barn. I am looking for the most efficient/effective heater that I can find. I am currently using a little ceramic space heater which seems to keep it above zero, but I don't think it is the most efficient. I am considerring an oil filled electric heater, but don't really know anything about them. If anybody here could give me any suggestions for the most energy efficient/most effective heater, I would really appreciate it.
Thanks,
Matt
 
  #2  
Old 09-02-05, 06:53 PM
K
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Oil filled.

It's the safest electric heat - I use one inside a large cabinet where I store paints and other chemicals. Like your application, this is in an unheated garage and the setting just keeps stuff above freezing.

Oil filled heaters are more efficient in that they heat more evenly, so they don't pump the air warm-cool, which induces drafts.
 
  #3  
Old 09-02-05, 07:49 PM
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Matt,

I too like oil filled heaters for the eveness to the heat but as far as efficiency goes all electric heaters are 100% efficient.
This means that every dollar you spend in electricity gives you a dollar's worth of heat.
The only time you would be concerned with efficiency is with combustion type heaters.
There are differences in the way the heat is distributed however and some locations, large ones for instance, may do well with a larger fan for better throw.

You don't say how large the room is or how cold it gets where you are but when it comes to efficiency, spending money on insulation would go a long way to saving some cash and making your choice of heater simpler.

How big is the room and how cold does it get?
 
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Old 09-02-05, 11:53 PM
K
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Originally Posted by GregH
all electric heaters are 100% efficient
Well put. I was struggling for a positive way to say all power wasted in a circuit must end up as heat, gave up.

Small enough requirement, one could use a curling iron or a lightbulb in a can, they'd be just as efficient.

Radiant heat deposits energy on walls, ceiling, etc. where much convects through and is lost. Anything that glows is throwing out radiant heat.
 
  #5  
Old 09-06-05, 03:23 PM
mrschmitt
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Room Size/Temperature in Winter

I would first like to thank everybody for all of your help. Looking more into this site, I think that perhaps I posted my question on the wrong site, but you guys all gave me very helpful answers.
The room that I need this heater in is approx. 10ft X 10ft. As far as the temperature in their. At night, it could get potentially as cold as 15 or 20 below 0 celsius(approx. -5 to 5 degrees farhenheit). I am planning on insulating the room more, but I just wanted to put in the best heater for this room right now. Any more suggestions with this new info would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Matt
 
  #6  
Old 09-06-05, 03:42 PM
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Matt,

Any plug in heater you buy will be a maximum of 1500 watts which is borderline for the space you have.
You mention safety as being a concern and if this is the only source of heat, any plug in portable heater would not be the safest way to do it.
They are known to cause fires and are really only meant as a temporary heater.
You would do well to run a 220 volt 15 amp circuit to this space which would give you several options.
A 2000 watt permanent electric baseboard heater would likely not cost any more than a good portable heater and would give you peace of mind.
 
 

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