Question about adding Heat Pump & Est. $


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Old 04-04-06, 04:46 PM
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Question about adding Heat Pump & Est. $

Hello:

I currently have a Trane TWE030C140A0 Standard Furnace/Air Handler. It was installed in 1993. A couple of years ago it stopped kicking out warm air and so I had a reputable firm fix it. They had to replace some sort of electrical contactor. They did so and it worked until about a week ago--it is now cycling air and working normally except that warm air is not coming from the returns--just cool air. I'm thinking there may be a similar problem.

Because of this, I was thinking about adding a Trane Heat Pump to mate with the air handler. The house is already plumbed for a heat pump with refrigerant lines going to a spot outside. There is also an adequate electricity supply outside for a heat pump in the same spot. (The builders had this in mind in the design.)

I am having two firms come out to give me estimates on this. I am thinking of adding the Trane XR13 or XR14.

Is this a reasonable option? What kind of estimate can I expect?

My home is 1800 sq. ft. with 10 air returns in rooms throughout this split-level home.

Thank you in advance
 
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Old 04-05-06, 05:32 AM
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Drex22

First a couple of questions.

What area of country do you live?

Do you have central air now?

How do you currently heat your home-with heat strips?

Your air handler appears to be a 2 1/2 ton rating. Keep in mind it is apprx 13 yrs old. Your Trane dealer should determine its compatibility with the heat pumps you have listed. Obviously they should also determine the size you require(load calculation) - 2 1/2 ton would be the max using existing air handler and existing ductwork.

Pricing varies depending on area you live but if this just an addition of a heat pump, I would expect price in the neighborhood of $3-4 K, a guesstimate.

Post back.
 
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Old 04-05-06, 11:40 PM
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Tiger,

Thanks for the response. I live in the NW area of the country--Washington State to be specific. I do not currently have air conditioning--the heat pump would be my first experience with that. For heat the Trane Air Handler/Furnace I described above heats the home-I would assume-with a coil of some sort. Also, one dealer did say the XR13 and X14 are both compatible. Yes, I can confirm that the Trane furnace is 2.5 tons.

Drex
 
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Old 04-06-06, 04:03 AM
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DREX

I doubt that you will receive the rated efficiencies with the use of your old air handler and that you would be better off in long run replacing it. In fact, you probably would get a better warranty with the purchase of the heat pump-a matched system.

With that said, the XR14 has better efficiencies especially in the heating mode. With the installation of your heat pump, dealer will need to resize your heat strip in old air handler for aux heating.

My opinion.
Good LucK!
 
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Old 04-06-06, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by TigerDunes
DREX

I doubt that you will receive the rated efficiencies with the use of your old air handler and that you would be better off in long run replacing it. In fact, you probably would get a better warranty with the purchase of the heat pump-a matched system.

With that said, the XR14 has better efficiencies especially in the heating mode. With the installation of your heat pump, dealer will need to resize your heat strip in old air handler for aux heating.

My opinion.
Good LucK!
Your analysis is right on, and it confirms what the dealers are telling me. They called it a "coil," not a heat strip, however--the component they would replace in my air handler. Seeing as how my current model is only 13 year old; it seems foolish to me to replace it--A Trane should last at least 20 years from what I've researched, though I do understand that what you're talking about is the mate between the two devices.

One more question:
How does the auxiliary heat work within the air handler? More specifically, since I live in a moderate zone, how often would the air handler be called in to heat the home rather than solely using the air transfer method in the heat pump?

Thanks again,

Drex
 
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Old 04-07-06, 05:51 AM
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Drex22

Heat pumps are sized according to cooling needs. In the heating mode, any additional BTUs required would be auxilliary heat and this is provided by heat strips. It works in conjunction with your normal heat pump function and would operate only when your thermstat can not be maintained.

You live in a climate with moderate winters. It would be difficult for me to determine the size of heat strips required because factors would include insulation qualities of home, your fam's comfort level, etc. Just guessing, I would think a 5 or 7.5 KW heat strip but only a true load calculation can be accurate. This is your dealer's responsibilty to determine.

More specifically, since I live in a moderate zone, how often would the air handler be called in to heat the home rather than solely using the air transfer method in the heat pump?

Your aux heat should only be engaged when thermostat setpoint can not be maintained in normal HP mode-this would be cold days probably where outside temp is below 30 deg fah.

My opinion.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by TigerDunes
Drex22

Heat pumps are sized according to cooling needs. In the heating mode, any additional BTUs required would be auxilliary heat and this is provided by heat strips. It works in conjunction with your normal heat pump function and would operate only when your thermstat can not be maintained.

You live in a climate with moderate winters. It would be difficult for me to determine the size of heat strips required because factors would include insulation qualities of home, your fam's comfort level, etc. Just guessing, I would think a 5 or 7.5 KW heat strip but only a true load calculation can be accurate. This is your dealer's responsibilty to determine.

More specifically, since I live in a moderate zone, how often would the air handler be called in to heat the home rather than solely using the air transfer method in the heat pump?

Your aux heat should only be engaged when thermostat setpoint can not be maintained in normal HP mode-this would be cold days probably where outside temp is below 30 deg fah.

My opinion.
Tiger,

Thanks for taking the time. Much appreciated.
 
 

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