Blower Noise from Electric Air Handler and Electric Heat Pump


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Old 12-24-06, 03:28 AM
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Smile Blower Noise from Electric Air Handler and Electric Heat Pump

Hi, if someone could help me it would be appreciated.
I have recently replaced my air handler and heat pump with new ones.
The blower noises from the old units were really irritating me.
The older units were approaching 20 years of age.

After replacing heating/cooling system I still hear the noises.
When I switch to emergency heat (to bypass heat pump) and only
use the air handler the noise is reduced but still apparent.

Its the intensity of the blower noise that is irritating.

The noise goes from intense (louder) to less intense (softer).

Any suggestions?

ratchetman
 
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Old 12-24-06, 05:45 AM
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Is this unit bigger than your old one ??? Sometimes people will replace a 2 ton blower with a 3 ton blower "sizes for example" and the duct work can't handle the volume thus creating a noise problem.
 
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Old 12-26-06, 02:06 PM
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Wink

What is the noise from the unit or just air noise? slow the blower down. The unit there are rubber pads that can go under it.
 
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Old 12-29-06, 05:21 PM
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Wink

There are all kinds of noises that can be associated with air-handler blowers...some are normal due to the dynamics of blower wheel operation. Since you say the old air handler was also noisey, and the new air handler didn't eliminate the noise, I will guess the return duct length is short allowing the blower noise to pass into the home via the return air inlet / grill. The type material used for the return duct will affect sound transmission. Metal without an inside liner is very sound conductive, flex fairly sound conductive and ductboard the least sound conductive, IMO...If you think this might be the case, you don't have alot of inexpensive options...I have on a few occasions "added" ductboard panels or liner to absorb some of the sound...I have replaced short sections of return with flex to reduce noise levels. As one of the other members suggested, slowing the blower to a lower speed should help, assuming the system will operate properly at the lower air speed/volume.

All this is assuming the air handler is in a crawl or attic...

Less noise with the condenser section off (Emergency heat setting) indicates some sound transmission via the tubing or simply the "noise" sometimes made by the refrigerant passing through the tubing and indoor coil...If the air handler is mechanically attached to the house, say with metal straps, or sitting on ceiling joists, some sound can be transmitted that way...

Your first step is to decide what the noise is: blower noise, cabinet vibration, tubing etc. Give us some more details and we can probably offer some more specific answers...
 
 

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