Condensate Drain

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Old 05-03-07, 08:14 PM
mjb
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Condensate Drain

I just added a P trap to the condensate drain outlet, as per manufacturer installation and operating instructions on page 9, http://www.smarterwayinc.us/refLIB/Goodman/1255/aruf/IO-230.pdf,on the airhandler. The original installer omitted this for some reason. As the drawing reveals, there are two drain outlets. The one on the left is being utilized. However, the drain outlet on the right is capped off. Should this drain outlet remain capped or am I missing something?

Goodman Heat Pump
AEPF-4260 VSM Air Handler
CPLT-60 Condenser

Air handler & condensate drain configuration:
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb140/mjbxx1999/drain.jpg
 
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Old 05-03-07, 08:19 PM
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Wink

Just let it capped. Make sure you put the P trap as the paper work said. You sure code there dont call for a overflow switch on that P trap
 
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Old 05-03-07, 08:35 PM
mjb
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http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb140/mjbxx1999/drain.jpg

Is it possible that the drain that is utilized is considered the primary drain and capped drain would be considered the secondary drain? If so, then this drain should be used as well. This is why I ask. It makes no sense to cap off a line that should be utilized.
 
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Old 05-16-07, 08:39 PM
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Not should be, could be.

The capped on could be used as a secondery drain, but the condensate should never get that high if you maimtain the system.

Basically, you have to use the primary and have an emergency drain under the unit (big pan) and both drained seperate. Why use the secondary when it's another pipe going through the wall and code doesn't requier it.

Chris
 
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Old 05-17-07, 06:34 AM
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Chris is correct. That's a multi position unit. The lower drain is your primary and the higher drain is the secondary "or overflow". If the unit is in a finished area or attic or anywhere else where if the primary drain was to get clogged and overflow and cause damage then you would sit the airhandler into a overflow pan and pipe the higher drain into it then run that drain to an area where you would not miss water dripping out of it.
 
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Old 05-18-07, 06:07 PM
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With out doing a lot of research

I think the extra hole you are worried about is a hold over from the days before the emergency pan was code.

Used to be you had the primary and the overflow in the unit which could end up routed to the same pipe to the outside. But clogged drains and fallen ceilings prompted a code change. This provided for a primary drain and emergency pan, but again they could be routed to one pipe. Again, poor maintenance and fallen ceilings.

These days, both primary and emergency must be piped seperately. But there is still that oveflow hole you are not required to use.

So all that comes down to my question for you. If you were the CEo of York, Carrier, Lennox, or who ever, would you spend millions to retool your factories to eliminate a drain you don't need/ Or would you leave well enough alone/

Chris
 
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