Question about installing a baseboard heater

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-18-07, 08:53 PM
8
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question about installing a baseboard heater

I have a converted single-car garage with no permanent heater. It has a 120v AC/heater in the wall, but the heat wasn't warm enough. We quit using the heater, and have been just using one of those oil filled space heaters. It heats the room wonderfully, but I am concerned about the safety of using this heater long term.

The the outlet the heater is plugged into has its own dedicated circuit.

What I want to do is change the circuit over to 240v and install a baseboard heater. Since the outlet for the space heater is the only thing on the circuit, it will be a simple change to make it 240v by simply replacing the breaker.

I run into a problem, in that I have no access inside the wall where the baseboard heater will be installed due to the concrete stub wall at the base of the wall. The outlet that the space heater plugs into is at the corner of the wall, and about two feet away from the location of the future baseboard heater. What are my options for getting wiring to the heater?

The two things I can come up are: 1) Using those surface mount metal wire channels to go from the heater to the outlet, and removing the outlet and putting one of those thin-mount junction boxes (I don't know if this is the right name) over the location of the outlet so I don't have any exposed romex. My only concern with this approach is that my wife won't like it at all! she won't like having the surface mount wire channel along the wall, even if for only a couple of feet.

2) Replacing the 120v outlet with a 240v air conditioner outlet and running a 240v air conditioner cord from the heater to the outlet. (I have seen one done like this before, but didn't know if it would get me in trouble if I tried to sell the home later).

Installing a line voltage thermostat on an interior wall won't be a problem.

The other option I had considered was to install a fan heater up higher on the wall where I could possibly get wire through the insulation, but I would prefer to use a baseboard heater.

Thanks in advance for your input.
 

Last edited by 8675309; 12-18-07 at 09:16 PM.
  #2  
Old 12-19-07, 09:08 AM
8
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I suppose my original post was too wordy... My question is: Is it okay to wire the baseboard heater with a 240v air conditioner cord and outlet, and have the outlet controlled by a line voltage thermostat?

Thanks again for any input.

Originally Posted by 8675309 View Post
I have a converted single-car garage with no permanent heater. It has a 120v AC/heater in the wall, but the heat wasn't warm enough. We quit using the heater, and have been just using one of those oil filled space heaters. It heats the room wonderfully, but I am concerned about the safety of using this heater long term.

The the outlet the heater is plugged into has its own dedicated circuit.

What I want to do is change the circuit over to 240v and install a baseboard heater. Since the outlet for the space heater is the only thing on the circuit, it will be a simple change to make it 240v by simply replacing the breaker.

I run into a problem, in that I have no access inside the wall where the baseboard heater will be installed due to the concrete stub wall at the base of the wall. The outlet that the space heater plugs into is at the corner of the wall, and about two feet away from the location of the future baseboard heater. What are my options for getting wiring to the heater?

The two things I can come up are: 1) Using those surface mount metal wire channels to go from the heater to the outlet, and removing the outlet and putting one of those thin-mount junction boxes (I don't know if this is the right name) over the location of the outlet so I don't have any exposed romex. My only concern with this approach is that my wife won't like it at all! she won't like having the surface mount wire channel along the wall, even if for only a couple of feet.

2) Replacing the 120v outlet with a 240v air conditioner outlet and running a 240v air conditioner cord from the heater to the outlet. (I have seen one done like this before, but didn't know if it would get me in trouble if I tried to sell the home later).

Installing a line voltage thermostat on an interior wall won't be a problem.

The other option I had considered was to install a fan heater up higher on the wall where I could possibly get wire through the insulation, but I would prefer to use a baseboard heater.

Thanks in advance for your input.
 
  #3  
Old 12-19-07, 11:29 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
Probably not, you would have to ask your local electrical inspector.
 
  #4  
Old 12-19-07, 02:36 PM
8
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's what I expected. I may have come up with a solution. The concrete curb wall is not as tall as a baseboard heater, so I may cut out a piece of drywall at the bottom of the wall to give a space to work in. After I run the wire over to the existing circuit, I'll replace the drywall. I've patched enough sheetrock that I think it won't be noticeable when finished.

Or... I may reconsider and get a fan heater to install. It would be above the curb wall anyway, so I won't have the problem. The impression I get from reading the forum is that those fan heaters are too noisy for a bedroom and that I would probably prefer a baseboard heater.

Thanks for your reply.
 
  #5  
Old 12-29-07, 06:11 PM
8
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
An update to my heater question

I ended up running an entirely new 240v circuit from the panel, as the "dedicated circuit" that the contractor put in when he converted the garage is sharing the common leg with the other room outlets in the room. Instead of running two separate 120v circuits, he ran a 3 phase 240v circuit, using 12-3 Romex, then split it at the garage. I simply left those two alone, and ran a separate 240v line with 12-2 Romex. Works great!

I started out using a fan heater, the Cadet Com-Pak Plus 2000 watt model, but it was way too loud for a bedroom. I took it back to Home Depot and picked up a Cadet 6' baseboard and one of those rlv430a programmable thermostats. I love the thermostat! It works much better than the Lux elv1 programmable thermostat I have used before.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: