GE heater and a/c wall unit. Problem or no ?

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  #1  
Old 10-21-08, 04:09 PM
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GE heater and a/c wall unit. Problem or no ?

This is a thru-the-wall "motel type" GE AJES06LSBM2 heater and a/c unit in a 15x20 foot, insulated shop, away from the house. 120V.

During the summer the a/c portion ran GREAT. Ran the heater portion for the first time today. The interior temp was 60 deg. when turned on.

After about 4 hours the interior temp is 65 deg. The air coming out is about 85 deg.

What I am not sure of, and I will call GE Technical later on, if necessary, is: This a heat pump?

Name plate data for heating portion reads: 12.0 amps; 1380 watts and 4100 BTU.

I had assumed there would be heating coils or strips inside that would put out 110 deg air or more.

Install/instruction book is not real clear. Heat dial is all the way up and fan speed is on high.

The vent is closed, meaning only air inside the room will be circulated

I do see in the book "Heat Pump Models. When the outdoor temp is lower than 25 deg F, heat is provided by the electric heater in the air conditioner instead of by the heat pump" "Note: The electric resistance heater in the 115V heat pump model operates during defrost when the outdoor coil temperature is below 36 deg F. It is not intended to provide full heat capability"

Outside temp this a.m. was about 36 deg and four hours later was about 50 deg.

Can someone clarify things for me, please
 
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Old 10-22-08, 11:57 AM
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UPDATE

I found the face page to the instruction book and this is a "Heat/Cool" item as per the AJES letters.

This book also covers "Heat Pumps" which are designated AJHS.

So.. before I call GE can anyone tell if there are heat strips or coils inside my unit? I don't want to look inside too much as I am a clutz.
 
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Old 10-26-08, 07:47 AM
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I emailed GE technical on 10/23 but no reply yet. Anyone want to take a guess on this?

I will start looking for GE parts lists or exploded diagrams for this unit. Any links you can forward?

Thanks
 
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Old 10-26-08, 09:17 AM
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Well I may have a PARTIAL answer to my question. Went to the GE appliance parts list website and see p/n WJ70X10054, Heater, ASM.
(www.myapstore.com which might get you there) I Googled "Parts List for GE air conditioner"

Not a coil or strip. It looks like 4 interconnected loops with something wrapped around about 1/2 of the loops.

It is somewhat similar to the heating element I saw in my long departed hot tub

Any thoughts ?
 
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Old 10-29-08, 08:25 AM
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I heard from GE "internet response team" members Rosemarie and Nikki, but still have an unanswered question as to why the 1380 watt unit can only put out 85 degree heated air as opposed to a just purchased 120 volt, 1500 watt, "fake" fireplace that puts out 325 degree heated air.

I will post their reply.

Anyone out there want to pontificate ?
 
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Old 11-12-08, 04:56 PM
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OK, GE arranged for a local A&E repair person to look at my unit.

Before I tell you the results, does anyone want to hazard a guess as to what A&E said and what are the correct parameters for this unit ?

I'm a bit disappointed that no one out there has/or heard of, the GE heat/cool unit I have or knows anything about how it works.
 
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Old 11-14-08, 05:43 AM
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The A&E guy called to say he had spoken to GE Technical and that the unit is operating as designed. (85 degree air coming out).
 
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Old 11-18-08, 02:56 PM
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A&E repair person did not come to the house. He called GE Technical and it was determined from their spec sheet that 85 degree air is the max that will come out of this unit.

This was not disclosed on GE literature I saw before buying this unit.

As previously mentioned it showed 1380 watts for the heater watts and 12 amps. Also 4100 BTUH-AHAM-1R for heating capacity.

Is 4100 BTU/hour a relatively low number for heating a 250 sq ft (bathroom closed off), room?
 
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Old 11-18-08, 09:15 PM
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Originally Posted by YaddaYadda View Post
As previously mentioned it showed 1380 watts for the heater watts and 12 amps. Also 4100 BTUH-AHAM-1R for heating capacity.

Is 4100 BTU/hour a relatively low number for heating a 250 sq ft (bathroom closed off), room?
If it gets cold (freezing or below) 4100BTU isn't likely to be enough to heat 250sq ft. Its hard to give you an exact answer because it depends on the number of exterior walls, number and type of windows, insulation, etc. You need to perform a heat loss calculation to get an exact answer. Offhand I'd say you need at least double the BTUs.

As an example I have a 2300sqft house matched to a 90K BTU furnace. The heat loss calc for my house says it will heat the house at 68 degrees down to -20F. 90K/2300 = 39 BTU per foot. Your working with 16 BTU per foot, which is less than half of what I have.

-Doug

-Doug
 
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Old 11-25-08, 11:23 AM
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Other than Doug's reply, I can see why this is the Do it YOURSELF forum.

I did get the GE heated air above 85 degrees yesterday. Up to about 95-100 degrees. The trick is to use a Vornado heater first, to get the inside temp up to about 70 degrees, THEN turn on the GE unit.

Previously, the inside temp was in the 55-60 degree level.

The air being vented outside, thru the unit, is cold. Right now the vented air is about 40 degrees, the outside temp is about 40 degrees and the inside air is 70 degrees. The GE unit is putting out 85 degree air with the Vornado on.

So does this not sound like a heat pump? Extracting heat from 70 degree air and pushing out 85 degree air and expelling 40 degree air outside.

GE promoted this in their literature as a "Heat/Cool" unit.

Any comments would be appreciated.
 
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Old 11-25-08, 10:42 PM
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Drawing only from my own experience the air blown across my heat pump coils is always noticeably lower than the outside temperature in heat mode. Maybe with a smaller unit its just not as noticeable?

There is an easy answer to whether its a heat pump or not though. Is the compressor running in heat mode? If it is then its a heat pump.

-Doug
 
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Old 11-26-08, 07:26 AM
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Other than Doug's reply, I can see why this is the Do it YOURSELF forum.

LOL now that is funny right there LOL

You might consider this a sounding board hossfly. There are people here that will try to help you to do something, but very few that will DO IT FOR YOU. Have to pay for that ole DO IT FOR YOU type of thing. There is a Radio Talk Show host in my area and his favorite thing is to mention to all listeners that the advice they receive is probably worth what they pay for it.
 
 

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